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Is home where you were born?

In an earlier post CIA wrote eloquently about turangawaewae. We both have complicated senses of identity – we’ve moved around; our fathers were both born overseas; we’re suspicious of the temptation of nationalism.

I moved to New Zealand when I was 21, which means I have spent more of my adult life there than anywhere else. Scotland, where my Dad was born, also feels like an intellectual home – if not a literal one. But I was born in Canberra. It’s not much of a city, but it’s where I’m from.

And I wonder, is home where you were born?

For a long time, Canberra was home. I like the gentle roll of hills in the distance. Age has rounded the hills. Australia is on old country, and its first inhabitants have been there almost as long as any people have been anywhere. The greens are subtle, almost grey in places. It’s a designed city, and it shows. In general, no buildings are allowed on the tops of hills, among other obscure regulations, preserving then sense of a garden city. There are exceptions, of course… Most people will tell you that Canberra is pretty boring. And they might be right. To see it another way though, it’s close to Sydney (in the way that Paris is close to Amsterdam); it has the great National Gallery of Australia; it made me who I am, for what that is worth.

Since August, 2010 I have called Leiden home. It’s flat here, and my mind still struggles with a landscape that is completely unnatural. Rivers have been moved, lakes have been drained, forests cut down, seas filled in. This is great for cycling, of course (though perhaps the lack of hills is a telling factor against Dutch Tour de France riders), but no hills is hard for my mind to accept.

A lightning fast visit (which included this stunning moment) at the beginning of this year has reminded me that I have a new home. Home in a deeper sense than the house you live in. Home with different resonance than the city you were born in. Wellington is the city that I found how to live in. It’s got hills – but young, vigorous hills. From time to time they rattle, and you feel the earth moving underneath you. It has a harbour that could stand for all harbours. It’s a dense city, with a green belt, and 100 days a year of 80 km/h gusts of wind. Someone with a better way with words than I have put it that it’s the world headquarters of the verb. But it’s my home-place. It’s where my new life started – it’s turangawaewae for me (I am respectfully borrowing the concept).

PJD

Photos by PJD. The first is a view of Canberra from Mt Ainslie; you can see the War Memorial, ANZAC Parade, and the old and new Parliament Houses, as well as the city. In the two of Wellington, you can see Oriental Bay, on a good day, looking across to the Cake Tin (or “Westpac Stadium” as it’s supposed to be called); In the last, you can see how Wellington can be a place for you to fill up the spaces with your own architecture.

376 Comments Post a comment
  1. your “home” is beautiful, wherever you make it. nice photos to see.

    June 4, 2012
  2. Interesting question — and I think most would agree the answer is “no.”

    My answer: Home is where you LIVE…happily, peacefully, enthusiastically.

    June 4, 2012
    • Yet so many live without all three.

      June 5, 2012
    • A good attitude I think! Thanks for thinking about the question and for enjoying the post!

      June 5, 2012
    • outdoorcanvas #

      Well said and I fully agree with your statement!

      June 6, 2012
  3. I too have a hard time deciding what home is. My passport says U.S.A. but I’ve lived my whole life overseas in different countries and now I reside in Canada…. on top of that my mom is from Liberia and my dad is from the U.S. which makes my a mixed-transnational-global citizen I guess. When people ask where home is I usually say the U.S. but I think I know home is where my family is… currently they are spread over the world in Qatar, Chicago and on Vancouver Island, Canada. lol… oh well

    June 4, 2012
    • Wow, you certainly are the definition of a transnational global citizen I think! Thanks for sharing your insight and experience, really interesting to hear, and to know that others also have similar experiences.

      June 5, 2012
    • Home is difficult for me to define too. I’m an Australian citizen married to a New Zealand citizen and we both grew up in Papua New Guinea and have lived in Singapore, Switzerland and Indonesia. I also teach students who have similar upbringings. They call us third culture kids, but I wouldn’t trade my experience for anything, not even being able to say I have a ‘hometown’.

      June 6, 2012
      • How much longer can Australia and New Zealand pretend to be separate countries, eh? I ask you..though to be fair, CIA always takes umbrage with this statement when I make it (she’s the Kiwi, I’m the Australian…)

        Where do you live now? As for hometowns, we all have one, it’s just some of us are lucky to find other homes. (I spent some formative years in Bangladesh, I guess that might make it into the sequel!)

        July 1, 2012
  4. Barbara Backer-Gray #

    Great post. I was born in Utrecht, the Netherlands, emigrated to Australia when I was almost five (to Collaroy, near Sydney), came back to the Netherlands when I was ten, and when I was 34, I emigrated to Texas, USA. I like your little comment about being suspicious of nationalism. I’m completely with you there.

    June 4, 2012
    • Thanks for your thoughts Barbara, and interesting to know you were born in Utrecht (great city, our favourite in the Netherlands so far!) and that you have been between Australia, the Netherlands and the US since. Have you found a sense of “home” in the US? Hope you are enjoying our blog. Thanks for reading!

      June 5, 2012
      • Barbara Backer-Gray #

        Yes, we lived in the Rio Grande Valley for my first twelve years here, and I was miserable. But five years ago we moved to Austin and it became home instantly. I’m looking forward to read more from you.

        June 6, 2012
  5. I feel you.

    I was raised hiking craggy volcanic Javanese mountains, but by an ironic turn of events I’m now living in the very flat Netherlands. “Home” is a constantly shifting concept for me.

    Congratulations on being Freshly Pressed!

    June 4, 2012
    • Thanks very much Valerie! Sure sounds like you, too, have an interesting relationship with the notion of what “home” means. The flat lands of this country, the Netherlands, never cease to amaze me, with the sheer lack of raised land! I’m told that venturing down towards Maastricht will bring me into contact with some hills though! Do you enjoy it here – do you plan to return to Java someday? Thanks for reading our blog, we hope you continue to enjoy it.

      June 5, 2012
  6. I think our notions of home can be quite complex. I was born in Norfolk, England but have lived for 12 years in Highlands, Scotland, and it has always felt like home, since I first visited when I was 3. After we moved here, I found we had relatives from about 6 miles away to where I ended up, going back hundreds of years. We had never known of family here before.

    June 4, 2012
    • You are right, they sure can be complex! Thanks for your comment and for engaging with the subject I tackled in this post, it is so interesting to hear others’ experiences. Incredible what you have unearthed about your family, it must be very exciting to learn of your ancestry in this way, and I am sure it has in turn impacted on your notion of “home” and perhaps deepened it even more! Hope you will continue to enjoy our blog.

      June 5, 2012
  7. I really enjoyed reading your post! Home is something that I still struggle with. I’ve grown up on two different continents and having a hybrid of an upbringing has shaped me as a person, but it’s also brought a question of identity for me. And I think the hardest part is when you’re forced to identify with one specific “home”, but you really can’t because you’ve taken the best from both words.

    Beautiful photography too πŸ™‚

    June 4, 2012
    • Hello, thanks for your thoughtful comment, it is somewhat heartening to know that others also struggle with this question; you are right, taking pieces from each place can really work best for some people. I like your notion of a hybrid upbringing. Glad to hear that you are enjoying our photos too; hopefully you will continue to enjoy our blog.

      June 5, 2012
  8. I have friends who moved around a lot when they were young and I will have to ask them! I am getting closer to more time spent in Boulder than where I grew up in Madison, Wisconsin.
    Now that I think of it, I was born in Milwaukee, but since I lived there under 2 years, I have always thought of my home as Madison.
    Congrats on being Freshly Pressed!

    June 4, 2012
    • Cool to know that this post made you think about this question perhaps in a way that you hadn’t considered the notion of “home” before! It will be interesting to know what your friends think about it too. Thanks for the comment, and hope you keep enjoying our blog.

      June 5, 2012
  9. Hi PJD,

    My past home is also terribly unmatched to my present— born in San Diego,CA,USA, then I lived in Hawaii, and finally, in France. I am still here since over 20 something years!
    My birthplace remains symbolic, though very beautiful to me. A gorgeous city that has loving cousins. Hawaii was where I had my early life memories capable of both smiles and tears.

    It’s really exciting to be able to plant new roots and once past the transplant problems, to be able to bloom in a new place :).
    Cheers!
    ( P.S. Your photo of Oriental bay is awesome!).

    June 4, 2012
    • I share your feelings about the connection to your birthplace – you don’t get to choose it, but you do get to choose how you relate to it.

      I am glad you liked the photo (it was just one of those lucky days, where the light shone right for me!), have you ever been to Wellington? to New Zealand? I can recommend it highly!

      Thanks for the comment!

      June 5, 2012
  10. Nastasja #

    I guess, home is where you feel good. Home is where you feel wanted and needed. We moved also to another country and into a totally different culture. With years you learn to live with these, you know to accept some things the way they are in order to feel they way you should: feel like home.
    Few days ago one friend asked me what will I do if I find a job again somewhere else? Or a love of my life? It won’t be easy to make a decision, yet it all depends on you and how you look at the things. Sure, I miss my homeland and the family which stayed there enormously but I learned to love those who are here (my new friends) and who are always there to support one. Key of a survival somewhere else is you.

    June 4, 2012
    • Hi Nastasja, appreciating your deep comment and thoughts on this topic. Sounds like you have some experience of your own with this notion of what “home” means, and it sounds like you have a clear idea of what it means for you, which is great! It’s also nice that you are able to pass on such advice to your friend as well. Thanks for commenting and hope you will keep visiting us!

      June 5, 2012
  11. I was born and raised in Hawaii and in my late teens moved to Florida. I really can not identify where I am from and that is not bad. I guess for now I would consider myself from Florida.

    Pride in your city and country is great for rooting for a football team or the Olympics. It gives one a sense of looking out for their home area. Beyond that, it is worthless. It breeds nationalism and discrimination. The best medicine for this illness is travel.

    June 4, 2012
    • I agree completely. Well Said

      June 5, 2012
    • Travel is good medicine for so many ills! Have you got any particularly favourite places to go to?

      I totally get the thing about not finding “where you are from” easy to identify. But I wonder, perhaps it is thinking about it, and questioning your own sense of identity that is the most important thing?

      June 5, 2012
      • Yeah, it could be…

        As for traveling, I really enjoy going to Brazil and the islands in the West Indies. I still have a lot of earth yet to explore.

        June 5, 2012
  12. I am the product of a military background, having moved around a ton as a kid, so I can relate because I have always struggled with my sense of place. Although, I like your term “home-place” and learning how to live in a place. Turangawaewae is a powerful word.

    June 4, 2012
    • Hi Dena, wow, yes, with a military upbringing I can imagine that would bring with it a whole other level of understanding of the idea of home and what it means. I think it is very personal, as the reactions overall to my post seem to be showing! Which is so interesting, that there is such a diversity of understanding amongst people as to what “home” means to them.

      Glad that you have found some resonance in my idea of a “home-place” and also the concept of turangawaewae. Appreciate you sharing your thoughts too and hope you will continue to enjoy our blog here.

      June 5, 2012
    • love the word too

      June 6, 2012
  13. Home is a place not thought of the things around it but more of what was done there! I consider my home the place where I can remember the most memories. A home is a home even if regretted or celebrated.

    June 4, 2012
    • I have never thought of home like that; thanks for the thoughtful comment. I suppose you have managed to summarise quickly what I took an entire post to get to. I hope that “home” is not regretted – but home does not always conjure perfect thoughts.

      You’ve really got me thinking about this again.

      June 5, 2012
      • I understand, but its a great place for closure of thoughts and to reach into your roots to finalize a thought.

        December 27, 2012
      • Sorry for taking to long to reply I left blogging for a bit to finish some business, but now I am back πŸ˜€

        December 27, 2012
  14. I’ve moved so many times I’ve lost count…to me Home is where I’m looked for by those I love.

    June 4, 2012
    • Hi Koco, thanks for the comment, sounds as though your life has been one on the move too (moreso than mine I think!). I like your sentiment here: love is an important part of what “home” means to many people I think – for me too I am sure.

      June 5, 2012
  15. verosupertramp85 #

    Very interesting post. I wrote a post last year called “What is home?” since I was born in Venezuela, but I have lived in so many places already that, somehow, I am a part of all of them and vice-versa. Now I live in The Hague (we are kind of neighbors;) and I consider this city to be my home, even more than my hometown in Venezuela. I am a firm believer that home is a place, a smell, a view, a smile that makes you feel at easy at that very moment. In this very moment I am eating spaghetti with pesto sauce (home-made) and I feel as if my mom just made it for me. Here I pass you the link to the post I wrote last year

    http://verosupertram.wordpress.com/2011/08/03/what-is-home/

    Anyways, this is a discussion that is worth doing with a bottle of wine! Take care!! And congrats for being Freshly Pressed πŸ˜€

    June 4, 2012
    • I am glad you like the post – I have been completely overwhelmed. I never expected to strike a chord with people like this. We are near neighbours! We read this comment on the train between Den Haag and Leiden. I love that you have given your bike a name (and what a name it is!). I completely share your sense of freedom on the back of a bike.

      Thanks for the comment, for the link, and I hope you enjoy the blog.

      June 5, 2012
  16. My husband and I both have complicated ideas about home too. It seems it would be very different to visit the place where you were born if you don’t know a soul there anymore, or if you never spent enough time there for it to sink in. But my mom always used to say, ‘home is where your clothes are,’ and now she and I both say, ‘home is where your cats are.’ When I get too wrapped up in this home question, that’s what I always think! Thanks for the thoughtful post.

    June 4, 2012
    • Thanks very much for your thoughts too! Glad that you found the post to be thought provoking and interesting. I like the points you make about if you visited the place you were born but knew no one there, or if you didn’t actually spend much time there originally. I think you are right here; it’s about a sense of connection to a place/people/space, and if the disconnect is stronger, it won’t resonate as “home”.

      It’s nice that you (and your Mum) have a home where your cats are! πŸ™‚

      Thanks for checking us out on foldedcranes; we hope you will be back!

      June 5, 2012
  17. I journeyed through Australia a couple years ago… and Canberra was one of the few cities I didn’t make it to. Now I regret it! Looks so pretty.

    For me, home is where family is. But I think everyone defines it differently. Because I was born, raised, and lived in the same house for the first 20 years of my life… I definitely consider my hometown to be “home.”

    Congrats on the FP! πŸ™‚

    June 4, 2012
    • FP has been very exciting! I can’t say I have often heard someone regret not going to Canberra, but if I have managed to engender a wish to travel there, then I will be happy. I hope you get a chance one day. Where abouts did you get to?

      June 5, 2012
      • We traveled from Cairns (SCUBA!)… down through Brisbane and Sydney. Then flew Adelaide, and drove the Great Ocean Road to Melbourne. Didn’t make it out to the west coast, or to the middle (Don’t get the big deal about traveling so far to see a big rock… but I’m sure it’s amazing.) I would LOVE to come back! It was the best month ever. Australia is just gorgeous. Have you ever been to the U.S.?

        June 6, 2012
    • Only to New York City – which I think simutaneously represents everything and nothing about the USA. One day I would like to do my own version and variation of On the Road (the Beats were influential in my early 20s), though this is tough to reconcile with an environmentally conscious point of view!

      You have probably seen as much of Australia as I have – though I suppose it’s not so uncommon to want to explore other places before you really look in your own back yard. I have heard Uluru (the big rock in question) is indeed amazing, but there are so many more things to do in the middle too, if you get the chance!

      July 1, 2012
  18. great post

    June 4, 2012
  19. That looks beyond beautiful and interesting thoughts. This was a great post!

    June 4, 2012
    • Thanks so much – when I wrote the post, I was not thinking many people would read it. So I have been a little taken aback by how people seem to really get into thinking about home. Thanks for the comment, thanks for the visit, and the encouragement.

      June 5, 2012
  20. I could really relate to your post… I’m only 16 years old, but I’ve lived in 7 different cities in 5 different states (I’m from the US). I think I’ve come to the conclusion that everyone has certain significant landmarks… the place they were born, the place where they grew up, the place where they’ve resided the longest… but ultimately, home is not a place. Home is wherever you’ve left a little part of yourself behind in the hearts of others. Alright, cheese fest over. Congrats on FP (:

    June 4, 2012
    • Nothing wrong with well-placed cheese. You’ve really managed to move around a lot! I am also really taken with the thought that home is what you leave with other people. This is a really different take, which has got me thinking all over again! Thanks for the comment.

      June 5, 2012
  21. It’s great that both places have shaped the person you are — different experiences give you more character πŸ˜‰
    Beautiful pics btw!

    June 4, 2012
    • Hello! I think you are right, different experiences definitely shape the person you become! So it’s nice to think that all of the places I have called home at one time or another – and my home-place as I like to think of it now – have each had a bearing on me in some way. What about you – do you have a strong notion of where home is for you?

      Very happy to hear you liked the photos – thanks for the feedback. Please keep enjoying foldedcranes and thanks for the comment!

      June 5, 2012
      • Hey, thanks for your reply πŸ™‚

        I was born and raised in Toronto, so I very much feel like this is my home. But I’ve moved around so many times while here, so I’m looking forward to when I can finally settle in a place where I know I’ll be staying for like 10 years. That’s what I’m missing πŸ™‚

        June 7, 2012
    • Replying is no problem (it’s just sometimes it takes a really long time…sorry about that!). I can hardly imagine the feeling of staying in a place 10 years! CIA and I have been thinking so hard about what to do with our lives that even our two year plans keep changing. And then of course, you go to some new place and it sits in your mind, tempting! (Berlin is like that right now…)

      Still, I can relate – we think also of settling down one day, so maybe I’ll keep an open topic for that day when 10 years is non-negotiable!

      July 1, 2012
      • no apologies necessary! well, i guess you cant force it. when the time comes to settle, and you find the right place to do that, it will happen πŸ™‚

        July 5, 2012
  22. For a very long time, home was, indeed, where I was born. And then, as I began to choose where “home” was, the concept of “home” began to change. Much of my original concept of identity was tied in my national origin, to my religious upbringing (or lack thereof), to the languages we spoke at home, and to the foods I liked. Over the decades, I have accepted and embraced the concept of home within. Wherever I am, that’s home!

    June 4, 2012
    • Hi Margarita, thanks for your thoughtful comment, is is nice to hear about your evoving relationship with the concept of home and what things have had a bearing on it at different times in your life. It is lovely that you feel a sense of home within yourself.

      So do you feel like you are adding new bits of home to yourself wherever you go – e.g. is it a constantly expanding and evolving concept for you?

      Thanks for having a read of our blog and we hope that you will continue to enjoy it and return!

      June 6, 2012
      • Yes, it is a constantly expanding and evolving concept. The interesting thing is that it is not about adding new bits, more about re-discovering and remembering what has been there all along. I was always a little taken aback when people would comment to me: “Wow, you’ve changed!” when my experience was, and has always been, one of becoming more me. Again, that concept of having everything already, and remembering where/how all the bits and pieces are. “Home is where the heart is,” is a common saying. Stop and think for a moment: where is the heart? Within each of us; therefore, so is home!

        Yes, I’ll stop by again. My daughter, too, is a wonderful crane folder. And after the September 11 tragedy, thousands of cranes were received at the centers that were set up to help survivors and victims’ families. That outpouring of goodwill in the form of colorful folded cranes was a welcome sight and reminder in those times of darkness!
        Thank you!

        June 7, 2012
  23. Katelyn #

    I completely agree with your statement about home being where you learned to live. I have a similar feeling for the 2nd city in which I lived after graduating college. I really blossomed into myself in that city and learned what it takes to make a new location your home by putting down roots, making connections and appreciating your surroundings and neighborhood.
    I am actually moving back to that city in the next few weeks because I feel the pull of “home”. Well said and thank you for sharing!

    June 4, 2012
    • Thanks for sharing too – may I ask where home is? (Of course, you don’t have to answer!) The relationships people have with places seems to be really deep – and I am really thrilled to have been able to strike a chord with so many people.

      Good luck with your move, and thanks for visiting the blog, and for the comment too.

      June 6, 2012
  24. Looks like a very pretty place! We’re moving from Florida to Colorado at the end of this week. I hope I find that to be “home”. πŸ™‚

    June 4, 2012
    • Hi Carol,

      Thanks for your comment! Yes, Wellington and Canberra are both, indeed, very prettty places. I’m fortunate that the place where I am currently residing (Leiden), is also exceptionally picturesque, in a completely different way (city wall remains, windmills, canals!).

      It sounds like you have a big and exciting move ahead. What takes you to Colorado?

      I hope that you find your new locale to be “home” too, and that you settle in well in the weeks, months ahead. All the best! Thanks for visiting foldedcranes, we hope that you will be back!

      June 6, 2012
  25. As I am related to Jypsies I believe home is where you feel most welcome and where in some respects you lay your hat. Due to various circumstances I have lived in at least two difference places since Towcester where I grew up. I current live in Salford which is very near Manchester and is built mostly around the river Irwell with lots of greenery as I stay here most of the time and have lots of friends here I consider it home . Salford has some hills. However also consider Daventry where I live in the holidays as home . This is much closer to Countryside and has lots of hills. Salford has the oldest park in England.

    June 4, 2012
    • I haven’t been to the part of England you are talking about – but I am sure I will make it there sometime. I find your point about home being where you are welcome really intriguing. Thanks for commenting, for your thoughts on home, and for visiting foldedcranes.com

      June 6, 2012
  26. This topic has always fascinated me.

    I once read a Native American short story where two of the characters had an exchange like this: (I’m paraphrasing) “I may not be from here, but I’ve lived here longer than you’ve been alive, so I’m technically more ‘from here’ than you.” It’s interesting how nationalistic humans have a tendency to become, when you can’t help where you’re born. Great post!

    June 4, 2012
    • We had a look at your blog today – as fellow vegetarians we completely feel your vibe! I love this paraphrased story too. Is it a Crow story? I have a really big thing about stories too. I am so glad you like the post, and thanks so much for taking the time to comment.

      June 6, 2012
  27. Home is where the heart is! I have always believed this…moving around as a child for me was hard because I never really grew a concept of where my home was and now I know my home is where my heart lies. Thanks for sharing!

    June 4, 2012
    • Home is where my heart is too – that’s where I met my wife (and of course, where she met me!) – and where we feel the strongest pull towards. It is hard when you don’t have a strong sense of home – moving can be really tough.

      Thanks for the comment, and for taking the time to read the post!

      June 6, 2012
  28. Reblogged this on Makais Blog and commented:
    good question! i think home is whereever it feels right

    June 4, 2012
    • agreed!

      June 6, 2012
    • Thanks heaps for the reblog and the comment! Glad that you think this is a question worth thinking about too. It’s nice that you have that attitude, and feel that you can find home wherever it feels right. Where is home for you now?

      June 6, 2012
  29. That lake photo was beautiful!
    Katie
    http://katieraspberry.wordpress.com/

    June 4, 2012
    • Hi Katie,

      Glad that you liked the photos, Lake Burley Griffin in Canberra is indeed beautiful, and in fact on some days, the Wellington harbour can be almost lake-like in its glassy stillness. Both beautiful places – have you ever visited that part of the world? Where is home for you?

      Thanks for dropping by and hope you will be back to visit us again!

      June 6, 2012
  30. Congratulations on being freshly pressed! You totally deserve it. I loved your post, I loved the way the words in the post sound. And don’t ask me why, I just loved what you wrote, full stop.

    June 4, 2012
    • I just had a look at your blog – but I only did one year of Italian at school, when I was six. I can’t remember much, except “grazie” and “prego” (though really can get you far!). It made reading tough though! Your comment is really one of the most special. Thanks so much for the beautiful encouragement.

      By the way, how do you like Germany? Is it homely?

      June 6, 2012
      • Hi there, yes I really like Germany! For the moment I like it more than Italy, which is where I’m from… Could it be that I’ve only been here for less than 2 years so I’m still in the enthusiasm phase? Could it be that I’m half German so I feel like I’m back home? Or none of the above? πŸ˜‰

        June 7, 2012
  31. I live only 60 miles from where I grew up. But with all these enticing travel blogs…
    No, really I like where I live and call the place home.

    June 4, 2012
    • It’s nice to hear that you have stayed living close to home, and even more so, that you like where you live and feel it to be home! Great. And, isn’t the internet amazing, to take us on journeys around the world, from right where we are. Travelling without moving has never been so possible! Have you travelled much away from home, and if so, where have been your favourite places, and if not, where would be the place you’d most like to visit?

      Thank you for the comment and we hope you’ll pop back to our blog again soon!

      June 6, 2012
  32. This may sound cliche, but home is where the heart is. Wherever your heart is, that’s where Home is. Lovely post!

    June 4, 2012
    • ….but true!

      June 6, 2012
    • It’s true – I have to say. Where CIA can be found, so can I be. And to some extent that is a home. When I wrote about home here, I was thinking it was a pretty tricky subject, but now I have so many more amazing points of view to think about!

      Thanks for sharing your thoughts (and cliches are cliches because they always ring true), and for stopping at foldedcranes.com

      June 6, 2012
  33. Lovely photos, especially the sparkly sunlit water in the first one. Your title is a significant question. I have thought about that concept a great deal over the last couple years after making a long-anticipated move which has gone awry. I think the answer to the question is relative to each person. (And I want facebook to change its choices and add something other than “hometown” in the profile choice.) Congrats on fresh press!

    June 4, 2012
    • Hi Linda, (or should that be, Mad Queen Linda?!)

      Thanks very much for the comment, and for taking the time to share your thoughts on the question I raised in my post! It sounds like it resonated with you, and that you have your own experience to draw on – I think you are right, it is very personal and depends on the person. The huge diversity of comments that my post has attracted has really emphasised that to me! FP sure has been interesting in that way – to have the chance to hear from such a range of people!

      Glad we were able to share something interesting with you, and that you enjoyed the photos.

      Sounds like you are on an interesting journey that you are blogging about! How long are you on the Magic Bus for?!

      Hope you will make another stop at foldedcranes.com again soon!

      June 6, 2012
      • Please call me Mad; everyone else does. I will always be on the Magic Bus. I think someone with initials after their name should mine the data produced by what may have been a simple query when you posted it. There’s a mountain of empirical evidence there (and that’s all I’ve got in big words for today.)

        June 7, 2012
  34. Interesting post, and congrats on being freshly pressed.

    June 4, 2012
    • Thanks a lot! I never imagined that my sense of turangawaewae, my sense of home that lies in Wellington (despite other homes) could generate so much thought!

      We appreciate the time you took to leave a comment!

      June 6, 2012
  35. No! I have many homes, for many different reasons. The closest truth is that ‘home is where the heart is’. By the way, flat landscapes scare me, I love the hills! πŸ™‚

    June 4, 2012
    • More than 18 months into living in the Netherlands, and we still cannot get to grips with the flat. I mean, in some places the water is higher than the land, and that’s just… wrong! Still, it is testament to the tenacity of the Dutch people, and their determination to hold onto their own homes.

      I am starting to see that hearts and homes are the same for many people. And I suppose that perhaps this is another way to access a sense of turangawaewae.

      June 6, 2012
  36. Pues parece un lugar estupendo para vivir…

    June 4, 2012
    • nazarioartpainting #

      Verdad que sΓ­. Un verdadero paraΓ­so.

      June 5, 2012
    • Β‘Muchos gracias! Wellington is a great place to live – or visit. Thanks for the comment, and for visiting our blog.

      June 6, 2012
  37. having personally lived in 5 countries, I think you are right. For me, home is not where you are born, but the place that makes you feel at ease. And homes can change. Glad to hear that you have found a place you belong.

    June 4, 2012
    • It’s nice to hear that you think the same! I think that home is a personal thing, it is where you feel true and comfortable in being, and it can be a fluid notion, but there may come a point in life where you just know the place that most feels like “home” for you. I guess it happens in different ways and for different reasons for different people; perhaps some will always feel that they are searching for home, which, I think, must be tough…

      Thanks so much for taking the time to make a thoughtful comment on our blog! Can I ask, where is the place that you feel you belong – your home?

      June 6, 2012
      • Right now, it’s Geneva Switzerland. Can’t say for in 2 years, but hopefully where ever it is, will find the same comfort I have here.

        June 7, 2012
    • We can never quite say with confidence where two years will find us; though after some time in ZΓΌrich, I can’t say I would be at all disappointed if it was there…! Geneva I have not quite got to yet, but soon maybe? CIA loved it there. Stranger things have happened.

      July 2, 2012
  38. I love this post so much! I don’t think “home” is where you were born, it is where you grow to belong. Congratulations on being Freshly Pressed πŸ™‚

    June 4, 2012
    • You have exactly captured the essence of the post! I am so glad you enjoyed reading my post.

      Incidentally, and tangentially, CIA agrees with you about the Simpsons, though I do not (perhaps I will write about the sublime excellence of the first six seasons, though I stopped watching sometime around then…); our positions are precisely reversed on the film titanic; and we share your feelings about alcohol (though I tried a lot of the stuff before reaching that conclusion!).

      Thanks for the comment, and the time you took to make it.

      June 6, 2012
  39. Interesting idea! As someone who moves a lot, I often wonder this myself. Great article!

    Cheers,
    Courtney Hosny
    http://www.oneweektocrazy.com

    June 4, 2012
    • Hi Courtney,

      Thanks so much for stopping by and making a thoughtful comment too. So, what do you think? Where is your home? What is it that keeps you on the move so much? It sounds like you would have some interesting insight from your experiences.

      Your blog looks interesting and we’ll be returning to take a better look around and read what you have to say too! Hope you’ll come back to foldedcranes.com as well – thanks again for stopping by!

      June 6, 2012
  40. Having lived in several areas, each of them have been “home” in a different way. It’s not just the buildings and streets, it’s also the people that greet you and who remember you after you’ve moved away.

    June 4, 2012
    • It seems I might have missed an important homely dimension – people are such an important part of a sense of home. Do you have a particular place you identify with? Do the memories of certain people carry more weight?

      Thanks for stopping by, and for leaving your thoughts!

      June 6, 2012
      • I have one place that I consider my spiritual home (a church-related place); I always feel relaxed and rejuvenated after visiting it and it brings out the “nice” in people. I also enjoy my own home and visiting my mom’s home for the same reasons.

        June 7, 2012
  41. I’ve always liked to think that “home is wherever I’m with you.” my husband and I live in Japan together, and even though it is different than our native USA in almost ever way, it feels like home for the two of us.

    June 5, 2012
    • Hi Michelle,

      Thanks so much for your thoughtful comment, and for taking the time to write! It is so nice what you say – a big part of home for me too, is CIA (my wife) and vice versa, me for her too. Wellington is home because it is where we met each other, and where we both feel a sense of belonging and standing in relation to. So it is nice to know we will return there! So, your sentiment is a really good one and works for us too!

      It is great to know that Japan, and Chibu, feel so like home for you both. Loving that you two also have a joint blog project like us, and that you are living far from where you are from and enjoying it too! JET must be amazing; CIA and I are looking forward to returning to your blog to learn of more of your adventures.

      Do you plan to stay in Japan a while longer? Had you guys been there for visits before you moved?

      June 6, 2012
      • Wow, thanks for such a meaningful response. The two of us are planning on staying in Japan for another year, possibly one or two years beyond that. I studied abroad in a different part of the country while I was in college and Khoa visited me for two weeks, but we had never been anywhere near Chibu before JET. I’m thankful that we enjoy our area and enjoy living on the island together πŸ™‚

        June 9, 2012
      • Hi!

        You are welcome! Sorry it’s taken a few days to reply to your last comment; we’ve been away, without so much internet access!

        So cool to hear about your time in Japan, and that you liked it so much to return and keep staying for longer still! I visited when I was 12, but haven’t been back since, despite really wanting to! I dearly hope to visit friends in Tokyo and Sapporo one day in the not too distant future; I’ve only visited Kyushu before. Also am really keen to go to Kyoto, have you been?

        I’d actually never heard of Chibu before reading your blog, so I’ve learnt something there! I hope JET is great; I’ve heard other people have really positive experiences!

        June 16, 2012
  42. Sean Breslin #

    Great post! And yes, home is “home” for me — Atlanta, Georgia.

    June 5, 2012
    • I’ve wanted to stop by Atlanta for a while. So far I’ve only been to New York City. But there is something about the south that looms in the imagination. What is it about Atlanta that makes it home for you?

      Thanks for the compliment, and for taking the time to read and comment.

      June 6, 2012
      • Sean Breslin #

        I just love the South…it’s where I’d love to spend the rest of my life. I just feel different any time I leave home.

        June 8, 2012
  43. alonaraevska #

    I believe that home is where you have peace, happiness, people you love and where you are always looking forward to come back to. No matter how long you are gone, that’s where you feel best. I am Russian, born in Ukraine, now live in US. Still wondering where my home is πŸ™‚

    June 5, 2012
    • When you say that home is “where you are always looking forward to coming back to” – I think that is at the centre of what I am thinking and writing about. Wellington looms large for CIA and for me.

      Figuring home out, well that might be the important part of having a home. Good luck figuring it out, and thanks for taking the time to share your thoughts with us.

      June 6, 2012
      • Alona_Raevska #

        Thank YOU for trigerring such an interesting discussion. I’ve heard a lot about Wellington, it’s such a beautiful place. One day hope to see it and share the delight you have about that place.

        June 7, 2012
    • You are a singer, right? If you do make it to Wellington, you could always try and set something up at Mighty Mighty or San Francisco Bathhouse (mighty venues, both!). It is a great place, and I hope you make it some day!

      July 2, 2012
  44. Love this. My name, my passport, all point to someone who is Geographically Confused. Now, I think Home is where the garden and dogs are, since the family is just as transient as I am. πŸ™‚

    June 5, 2012
    • Geographical confusion is no bad thing. Our plan is to plant a garden one day (I think there is a German saying, something about building a house, planting a tree, having a child? that’s a good life?). Hopefully we can get some kind of lemon thing going on too (We sneaked a look around your blog. Limoncello! I am getting distracted now.

      Thanks for taking the time to read and leave your thoughts.

      June 6, 2012
  45. Home is where they feed you… πŸ™‚
    I hope you like my images of a cooler place … a little πŸ™‚
    http://damantigui.wordpress.com/2012/05/27/patagonia-photos-enes

    June 5, 2012
    • hahaha so true!

      June 6, 2012
    • I do! I would so love to travel to Argentina. My friend at work tells me about Buenos Aires, and the town that his family is from all the time.

      And if there are empanadas…maybe that’s home?

      June 6, 2012
  46. Laura #

    That’s an interesting question for me to answer, because the two places where I’ve felt most at home are places I was just visiting for very short stays (Scotland, 10 days, and Vienna, 3 days). I’ve lived most of my life in the same city, same neighborhood, and almost the same house. The only times I’ve been away (different from vacation) were for studying, 5 years in Rio de Janeiro and 1.5 years in England, and although I was happy living there I never felt completely at home. BTW, I think nowadays home is where my dogs are!

    June 5, 2012
    • If home is where the dogs are, the nice thing is that home can be anywhere! I like Edinburgh in particular – where in Scotland struck you? How did you find Vienna? (It’s on our list…but we haven’t made it there yet).

      Thanks for taking the time to comment, and for visiting foldedcranes!

      June 6, 2012
  47. It’s incredible that the sense of home is so connected to land-scape. I find that a certain mind set of the people living around me is also important- even if that mind set isn’t positive.
    And on the topic- we mustn’t forget the immortal words of Captain Hammer – home is where the heart is, so your real home’s in you chest!

    June 5, 2012
    • June 5, 2012
      • Oh man, I have not got around to watching this whole series yet. I feel totally uncool right now! (But also cooler with this comment). Thanks a lot! It really made me laugh (which can be embarrassing on the train…)

        June 6, 2012
    • It is interesting isn’t it – that for different people, the concept of home can be connected to different things! I think what has been really evident in all the comments that have come back on my post is that there is such a wide range of meanings of “home” and that it is indeed very personal!

      Thanks heaps for taking the time to check out our blog, and to comment. We hope you’ll be back to foldedcranes!

      June 6, 2012
  48. It’s funny to try answering this question… My first instinct is to say yes, as that’s where all my beloved family still is, but I have been moving around since the age of 16, and have called quite a few places home. As cheesy as it may be, home is where your heart is.

    June 5, 2012
    • When home is where your heart is, the nice thing is it’s easy to carry it about (and it doesn’t weigh too much, useful for backpack(erina)ing. I found it a strange feeling to think that home was not where my parents were anymore, which is probably one of the triggers for writing this post.

      Thanks for stopping by, for taking the time to write a thoughtful comment, and for reading my post!

      June 7, 2012
  49. Nice post! While I don’t think home is necessarily where you are born, I believe it is where you spend your formative yearsβ€”when you are completely aware of the world around you. That impression is really hard to forget and ends up feeling like ‘home’ for the rest of our lives.

    June 5, 2012
    • I think what I have learned from so many people is that for almost everyone the formative years appear to come at different stages. For some, it seems, the place you learn to ride a bike is key, for others university, for others still the first town they got a job in. I feel really privileged to have been able to get this insight into how other people think of home.

      Thanks for your thoughtful comment, for taking the time to write it, and for visiting.

      June 7, 2012
  50. Congrats on being freshly ‘laundered’ ! I love the style of your blog and the posts are defo worth a trawl through! I stretch the ‘where are you from/born’ reply (and I get asked it pretty much every day) to the East Riding of Yorkshire (UK) because, I was born at Beverley Westwood……..and because I hate having to tell people that I lived the first 35 years of my life in a grotty fishing port/northern town. It may also have been the home to such luminaries as Andrew Marvel, William Willberforce, Amy Johnson, and the ubiquitous Maureen Lipman at certain points in it’s history but it was also the city that kicked off the English Civil Wars in the 17th Century…….so the Royals have never visited much since. It’s a place that doesn’t really say anything about me, particularly as from the age of about 6 I was trying to dream up ways of making it to Australia. I’ve lived in QLD for nearly 7 years now and this IS my home and probably always was even when I didn’t live here. I’m an Australian who just happened to be born overseas πŸ™‚ and if it’s any consolation, I’ve not been to Canberra yet……..but I’m pretty sure it’s still going to be beat Hull.

    June 5, 2012
    • It’s taken a while to get here, sorry for taking a while to reply (in the end, the sicky was not my best option!). I haven’t been to Hull, but I do really like grotty fishing ports in the north (actually, good son of Scot that I am, I should say, south…). At least, I like the idea of them.

      As for royals, well, the fewer the visits the better I say, but I am quite fervantly republican (to the chagrin of my English colleagues in this Jubilympic year).

      Thanks for sharing, and congrats on fulfilling the dream of getting to Australia!

      June 7, 2012
  51. dionnevictoria #

    It’s hard to define home with any one place. It’s true that home is where the heart is, or rather, home is inside you. I’m finding being abroad that there’s no home for me not even at “home” because even while I was there I wanted to be somewhere else. I’ve realized this desire to settle somewhere is a desire to settle within myself and be happy where my body may be. I really appreciate the post. It made me feel at home. πŸ™‚

    June 5, 2012
    • I’m honoured to have been able to provide a sense of home – really it makes me grin foolishly to think I managed to create that sense for someone else.

      I find the use of the word “home” whilst abroad particularly interesting; home can be mijn thuis; it can be New Zealand; sometimes it’s Australia. Sometimes its hypothetical (subjunctive?). Where will our next home be?

      You’ve got me thinking again – great comment, thanks for writing.

      June 7, 2012
  52. Funny, I see from the comments that most people took your title question as a philosophical one. Even though I’m a philosopher by training (I know, yeegads), I guess I just automatically assumed you were asking a basic, physical question: Is where you live now where you were born? And I thought, oh, what an interesting survey to make!

    Well, it sounds like most of your readers are like you: definitely not living in the place where they were born. Oddly enough, though I have lived in a couple of different countries and several major cities, I am now back living only twenty miles from the hospital where I was born. I didn’t think this is what I’d end up doing, but I have to say that I find it very rewarding to be back in a place where people knew me as a child, where everyone knows my parents, where I feel like everything I give to the community is just giving back for everything it’s given to me. My community isn’t anything special–a rural county with only about 20,000 inhabitants very spread out–but it has become something special to me because of my history with it and with the people in it.

    Thanks for your thought-provoking post!

    June 5, 2012
    • I am a mere student of literature (among other things) though I had a hefty dose of theory thrown in, which hurt like it was philosophy. So I will admit that I was at first, a little intimidated by your comment. But now that I have read it over a few times, I think I am getting to grips with it.

      I am so thrilled to have got so many people thinking (and, another honest moment, a little shocked, because I really thought only about 30 people would ever read it). It’s been pretty special hearing about home from so many.

      That sense of a home giving back what you are putting in, and that because of what it’s given to you, you give more – a virtuous circle? – that’s a really important thing I haven’t been able to articulate before. So, thanks to you for your thought-provoking comment, and for taking the time to write!

      June 7, 2012
  53. Your post reminded me of a song by the Australian band called The Waifs. The song is “When I Die…”

    June 5, 2012
    • I saw the Waifs play at a bar called Tilly’s in Canberra. I don’t think I have thought about them for almost 15 years! Imagine that.

      Thanks for the comment!

      June 7, 2012
  54. I moved when I was 8 days home, so “no,” home is not necessarily where you are born. As someone who has moved over 30 times, I think home is the place that finally allows you to put down roots–the place where (to borrow a quote from Cheers) “everybody knows your name.” For me, I didn’t discover this place until I was in my thirties.
    Thank you for asking this question. It is something I have wondered for years, particularly when people ask me, “where is your hometown?” Based on my “vagrancy,” you can understand my confusion. lol.

    June 5, 2012
    • I guess you are proof that even vagrants can find a home! You are welcome – I am not sure I could have managed not to ask the question. I suppose we are really lucky that the question got put somewhere where you could see it!

      Thanks for commenting – and the quote from cheers did elicit a laugh from me.

      June 7, 2012
  55. As for me, I was born in Winnipeg but feel more at home in Vancouver.

    June 5, 2012
    • If I were ever to go to Winnipeg, and then on to Vancouver, what are the two best and coolest experiences I could get?

      We love local knowledge see!

      Thanks for stopping by. πŸ™‚

      June 7, 2012
  56. Growing up I was an Army Brat. When you’ve lived all over home takes on a new meaning. I don’t consider my place of birth my home. I believe home is where ever you are most comfortable and the place that you love the most. I also believe this can change.

    June 5, 2012
    • Firstly, stuffofstartling is a name after my own heart. I agree particularly with your last remark – home can change, no doubt. And it should be so – as we build our own lives, our own families, it would be weird if your sense of home didn’t change, right?

      Where is home now?

      June 7, 2012
      • Well thank you.:) Exactly, if it didn’t change it seems like you would have lived your life exactly the same throughout. Which sounds quite dull. Currently home is Florida. We’ve been here since my dad retired, seven years ago. We’ve been itching to go and experience somewhere else though.

        June 17, 2012
  57. I moved around constantly while I was growing up. I was born in Louisiana (with Cajun roots) and I don’t have a single memory. How can that be considered home?

    I agree with this comment – “Pride in your city and country is great for rooting for a football team or the Olympics. It gives one a sense of looking out for their home area. Beyond that, it is worthless. It breeds nationalism and discrimination. The best medicine for this illness is travel.”

    Excellent post. Thank you for sharing. πŸ™‚

    June 5, 2012
    • Wow, thanks very much (feeling somewhat humbled at the response!). I have to ask, as I am completely intrigued, you grew up (immemorably) in Louisiana, but where are you now? Is that Chinese script? Actually, so I went and had a look. I like your photos too! How did you end up in Taiwan? (I hope this isn’t coming off stalkerish…)

      June 7, 2012
      • Right now, I am in between Florida and Taiwan. I moved to Florida for a guy. xD We got married. 5 years later, my husband wants to go back to his home country. I say, “Sure, why not?” Who knows, we might go somewhere instead. For instance. Singapore. We’re both open to new possibilities. We’ll see. πŸ™‚

        I do have Chinese characters in my blog. πŸ™‚

        Thank you to even bother to take a look at my blog. xD

        June 8, 2012
  58. Home for me is somewhere where you never have to explain yourself.
    Congrats on being FP! I think it’s great how your post inspired everyone to reminisce and really think about what home means to them.

    June 5, 2012
    • I never anticipated that my words could generate so many unique and interesting responses! I have to agree with you – since when I think about it, I really do find in Wellington explaining myself is not necessary the way it can be here in Leiden.

      Thanks for the comment!

      June 7, 2012
  59. what a great thought…
    it hink home is where you choose to make it.
    you dont necessarily have just ONE…
    i grew up in the philippines and now live in new york. every time i go home to manila, i feel as if I have left a part of me back in new york, and like nobody in manila could possibly know me fully if they have not known me in my new york existence. same goes for when i am in new york…nobody here has known me as a child… in this day and age, its hard to pinpoint just one place where you feel 100% complete.

    June 5, 2012
    • Rapid, more-or-less-affordable international travel, and globalisation really have changed and challenged the sense of home, haven’t they? It’s strange to think, but when my grandfather moved with his family (my father amongst them) it took them weeks to get to Australia from Scotland. And I can get there in hours.

      I have to say, as a tangent, we are pretty jealous that you are living in NYC (we love it so much there).

      Thanks for the thought, and for sharing it!

      June 7, 2012
  60. L #

    I think you can have more than one home. I never had a family home growing up because we moved so often (father in real estate), usually within the same city but I consider my grandmother’s home to be my family home because it has never changed in my whole life. I think that wherever you ‘feel’ at home then that’s where you should think of as your home. Without getting all existential (cause who wants to be that!?), you are home when you are contented within yourself, where those around you are familiar and you feel at peace. This could be anywhere. As a fellow colonial decedent I believe that if I were to go to Ireland or Scotland (both places I’ve never been to) I would feel like I belonged there as well. Who knows? Great post though!

    June 5, 2012
    • I hope you get a chance to visit the old countries. I particularly love Edinburgh. Any plans? I would be curious to know if they did feel like home…Thanks for commenting. I am glad you enjoyed reading. Being contented, surrounded by familar and friendly faces and a feeling of peace sounds like home to me too.

      June 7, 2012
      • L #

        I haven’t visit yet. The closest I’ve gotten is London… and it’s a far cry from “the old country” I think. I’d love to go eventually… just need to get my ducks in a row first πŸ™‚

        June 8, 2012
  61. Freshly Pressed, With Australian Pines, no less!!!

    June 5, 2012
    • The biggest irony is that the Australian (Norfolk) pines are actually in Wellington, New Zealand! Trans-Tasman rivalry may have reached new heights…

      June 7, 2012
      • I’ll have to read up on “Trans-Tasman” rivalry, because I’ve never heard of that expression. Is that on the order of a foot ball team rivalry?

        June 14, 2012
    • Ahh, yes, trans-Tasman rivalry. The sea between Australia and New Zealand is called the Tasman Sea (also known as just “The Tasman”, also “the ditch” and also “the pond”). As with many larger/smaller country pairings (think Netherlands/Germany; Canada/USA; Portugal/Spain; Belgium/Netherlands; Scotland/England), the rivalry between Australia and New Zealand is fierce in general, most especially with Rugby, and with Rugby League (New Zealand with the edge in the former, Australia with the edge in the latter).

      But the expression is generally applied to anything in which Australia or New Zealand may each have some slight claims (see, in this case, pavlova).

      July 2, 2012
  62. I am one of the few replies that has ended up living right back where I was born. But as described in my blog, I would say home is made up of pieces of other places you have been that affect who you are and that encourage you to love life no matter where you are.

    June 5, 2012
    • What has been so interesting about reading these comments is how everyone has just a slightly different idea of home – such a crucial human concept! I like the idea of a home made of pieces of places. Such a home would be very internalised, and safe, I think!

      Thanks for the great comment!

      June 7, 2012
      • Brings new meaning to the saying “home is where the heart is”

        June 8, 2012
  63. I like this.

    Reading it, I find that maybe home is where we live our current life, and we live many lives within our life span.

    Thanks for the great post.

    June 5, 2012
    • That’s a really interesting point of view – with some more thought, I think my post agrees with you a little bit – every place I have lived has been a home for me; but I think some have been more homely than others! Thanks for reading my post, our blog, and for leaving this nice comment.

      June 7, 2012
  64. Beautiful pictures! “Home” can be so many places all at once. I feel at-home in my mom’s house, as I do anywhere on the beach with my dad. And I do in my own home with my fiancee, as I do in his family’s house in France.

    June 5, 2012
    • I agree that home is almost anywhere, almost anytime. I love how you have linked home with special people in your life. Thank you very much for a thoughtful comment.

      June 7, 2012
  65. Home is definitely a difficult word to define. Every time I think I am ready to write the definition into Webster format, it seems to change. For now, “home” is just where I am….wherever that might be. Beautiful pictures. Thanks for sharing.
    You Matter! Smiles, Nancy

    June 5, 2012
    • I thought I was getting pretty close in articulating home, for me. But now I have read so many wonderful and diverse views of home, I think I may need to start over. Technical definitions may always elude us. Let me know if you ever nail it, eh?

      Thanks for commenting, and taking the time to read my post!

      June 7, 2012
  66. Great post and such a thought provoking question. I have lived in in 3 different places and all are within an hour of each other. As such, the town I was born and grew up in still feels like ‘home’ to me. Whenever I go back I feel a sense of belonging and identity.

    That being said, I completely believe that if I moved to somewhere that fitted me perfectly I would perhaps feel different about the subject.

    June 5, 2012
    • The first thing I saw when I went to your blog was cocktail recipes, and I felt at home. So, home is a very flexible concept! I am interested in what you might mean by “finding somewhere that fitted perfectly” – with the implication that home right now does not fit perfectly? Are you looking for a new home?

      I don’t mean to pry, but as you can imagine, all this talk of home makes me curious…

      June 14, 2012
      • I’m so glad that you’re enjoying the cocktail times!

        I don’t mind prying! So here’s the situation:

        I currently live in a small seaside town with my best friend – which for the most part is AMAZING. We’re those scarily close types.

        The downside is that our unit is quite small, especially my room. As such, I don’t really have much of my swag here and I store a lot of things in boxes under my bed. This naturally invokes a constant sense of the temporary.

        On top of that, I spend a great deal of time at my boyfriend’s as well as having to drive an hour each way to work everyday. The result of this is living out of a travel bag for at least half of every week.

        I hope all of that makes sense. I guess I’m just looking forward to having a more permanent residence in the near future.

        June 14, 2012
  67. nazarioartpainting #

    It is home the place that you feel good.

    June 5, 2012
  68. Nicholas A.D. #

    Yeah, I definitely don’t look at the city I was born in as home.

    June 5, 2012
  69. rickinskorea #

    Home to me is where I am at any particular point. An effect of having moved around a lot (not that I would change a thing)

    June 5, 2012
    • I guess you are like the tortoise? Though many here have said “Home is where the heart is”; which could be tricky, if it’s on your back…

      June 14, 2012
  70. Paniz Kh #

    Home is definitely where it feels like home, where you feel you belong to. I’m 16 and immigrated to Canada last year, but, I’m pretty sure that my concept of home is going to change in the coming years, as it has already started shifting to Canada.
    Great post, great pictures.

    June 5, 2012
    • I have to say, a casual browse of your blog and I got weed, torture and reading. Certainly all are elements in the quest for a good home, in both physical and metaphysical senses. I have no doubt as you spend longer in a place your relationship with where you were and where you are adapts. So, good luck on that adventure! Thanks for the comment, and thanks for the compliments!

      June 14, 2012
  71. I was born in Canada and have lived here all my life. But in different regions of Canada: southern Ontario, British Columbia (Vancouver) and now, in the prairies, Alberta.

    My heart is still Vancouver and Toronto. For a number of reasons, including cultural and some climatic differences among all 3 regions, Alberta is a harder fit for me.

    Sounds real windy where you are. We get the chinook winds caused by the Rockies. I understand there’s a place in Peru that experiences the same type of wind phenomena as we do.

    June 5, 2012
    • A Wellington southerly is something to behold. I am not sure I like the sound of chinook winds either!

      It’s funny too, how geography can make a place feel like home, or really turn you off it, eh? Thanks for commenting!

      June 14, 2012
  72. Well, I was brought up to believe the home is where you hang your hat. So, right now, it’s the USA

    June 5, 2012
    • I recently got a hat – next I need something to hang it on! Then I’ll have to write about home all over again, imagine that!

      Thanks for the comment, and reblogging!

      June 14, 2012
      • Well, I am looking forward to reading about your new home and posting more of your blogging!

        Have a great day!

        June 14, 2012
  73. Reblogged this on EMPOWERED RESULTS ~ Creating A Difference In Our Communities… and commented:
    Hi my Readers! This one was a bit touching to me. You see, I am a military ‘war baby or brat’ who was born in Germany but lived all over. As a teen, I lived in the US Virgin Islands but now reside in Florida. So, would it be safe to say my current home is the USA? Well, I was brought up to believe that home is where you hang your hat. So, I guess right now…it’s the USA!!!
    Enjoy!

    June 5, 2012
  74. Enjoyed your post and your ponderings. I’m a “Third Culture Kid” myself, being born and reared in Africa where my parents worked, spending 11 years in Canada during my teens and early 20’s and now living in the USA. I’ve often wondered where home really is in this big world with all of the travel and places I’ve lived and visited. I’ve noticed that every place has it’s own kind of beauty and that some places take a while to get used to or to enjoy. Home is where the heart is in my opinion.

    June 5, 2012
    • Home, it would appear on the basis of my very scientific analysis of the comments on this post* that home is where the heart is certainly resonates with many people.

      I guess I was really saying something similar. I found a lot of things in Wellington, and so a piece of me stays with that, and then also, I carry a bigger piece with me.

      Thanks for the comment, and for introducing me to the term “Third culture kid”!

      *please note: there was nothing scientific about my analysis

      June 14, 2012
  75. I think home is wherever you make it. I have been traveling since I was 17 searching for a home because the city I was born in doesn’t feel like home at all.

    June 5, 2012
    • Have you found any contenders for where home might be yet? It’s funny, because Canberra probably feels more like home to me the further away I get from it (probably more in the sense of time, than space). But, then again, reading something like “On the Road”, I feel at home in my mind on the plains driving to Colorado. And believe me, I have never been to Colorado.

      June 14, 2012
      • hahahaha my contenders are Toronto and Colorado. Nature, a sense of calmness and some city aspects. Sounds like the perfect home to me.
        But I I do too feel like my city is home when I’m far away…I wonder if living for a long period of time somewhere else will also make u feel “homesick” for tht place…or is tht feeling just for your real home?

        July 26, 2012
  76. Alyssa #

    When you go to other places and suddenly it feels like…there’s no place like home (thinking of that special place where your heart is). Congrats on making this post to freshly pressed by the way. πŸ™‚

    —————–
    colorado springs divorce lawyers

    June 5, 2012
  77. I clung to the notion that I was from where I was born for a long time, until I started to realize that I’m most secure to be with the people I love. To me, home can be something you keep in your heart.
    I did see a pillow once that said, “Home is where your Mom is.” That’s also true.
    Thanks for writing! Check me out at theusualbliss.com sometime.

    June 5, 2012
    • A baby in a wok, is maybe blissful – but I am vegetarian! (I, by the way, checked out your blog). We’ve been travelling, so apologies for the slow reply. But, you are right about home, and people. I think we all have to be attuned to the possbility that home means a physical place, a space in the mind, and perhaps many things between. How can we know what someone means, sometimes?

      Thanks for stopping by, and for the comment!

      June 14, 2012
  78. Congratulations! What a lovely post.The photos frame it as a dream of a place to live in.While I feel that ‘Home is where the heart is’,without doubt the absolute truth,our first impressions of life-the taste,the surroundings,the love and care of our parents, the feel,the experiences we grew up with, will always be the ideal home we carry with us in our mind.

    June 5, 2012
    • Hi Paddy,

      I have to say – Wellington is a great place to live, and it’s a great place to call home, but believe me it’s not always quite so dream-like! I like the distinction you make between three kinds of home – the home of your heart, the home of your mind, and by implication the place you are right now.

      Lovely comment!

      June 14, 2012
  79. home is where you hang your hat it could be thousands of miles from your birth place great article

    June 5, 2012
    • What if you don’t have a hook to hang it from? Or, worse still, a hat to hang?!

      June 14, 2012
  80. As I am currently traveling around the world, I’ve noticed that home is where you feel comfortable. Once a comfort settles, then a home can be made.

    June 5, 2012
    • I can really relate to that – the Netherlands will never be as homely for me as Wellington or Canberra are, but now that I speak a little Nederlands, now that I have the rhythym of a market town, now that I have an OV chipcard, I totally get something of a comfortable feeling.

      Have any particular places made you feel particularly comfy?

      June 14, 2012
  81. Hi I’m new please add me =*) beautiful photos nice and interesting

    June 5, 2012
  82. yea, I don’t think it is, I was born in malaysia but lived in new zealand for half my life, and I call NZ home still, eventhough I am now working in M’sia…..

    June 5, 2012
    • How have you found going back to Malaysia? Whereabouts were you living in New Zealand? I found even going back to New Zealand after 18 months away in Europe was a bit of a shock. Going back to Malaysia must be something else!

      June 14, 2012
      • Oh coming back to M’sia was a shock indeed!!

        June 15, 2012
  83. I am also a “transplant” (as one not so well-meaning coach put it, and I co-opted the phrase), and I love it. It gives me a sense that I know myself because of all of the places I have lived, and not in spite of them. I also believe that people make our homes, and as long as we love the people we are around, any place can be home. Great post, and beautiful home!

    June 5, 2012
    • I think people are really important in home-formation. For me, it was meeting my wife-to-be that really had me find a home in WGTN. Really, I had lived there for a few years already but had always resisted its windy charm. Transplant, eh? So many places to go with that! I am so glad you found a way to turn it around.

      June 14, 2012
  84. Nice post. I’m another one who doesn’t think home has to be where you were born. For me, even though I spent my childhood and student years in the US, my adult life has been entirely in Japan. I’ve built my career, family and household here in Tokyo, and as a result this is more my home than any other place I’ve been.

    June 5, 2012
    • Japan must have really got under your skin! Have you ever thought about how cultural differences might influence the conception of home? How do they talk about home in Japan?

      Thanks for the comment, and sorry for such a slow reply…

      June 14, 2012
  85. There are three different cities I call home: where I was born, where my parents and younger siblings live, and where I go to college. I never know what to say when someone asks me where I’m from, and it sounds funny when I talk about leaving home to go home, but I couldn’t choose just one hometown because I feel that all three places are part of my identity.

    June 5, 2012
    • I have even called three places home in one conversation! So I can completely relate. I think I need another post called “Home: it’s not where you were born” to encapsulate all the thoughts comments like this one have triggered! Thanks for visiting our blog!

      June 14, 2012
  86. It’s a fascinating question, the answer to which has been changing, and evading me for the better part of 50 years. When I left “home” to go to boarding school, home was my parents’ farm near Griffith, NSW. That piece of earth, where I had learned everything except what they taught in schools, remained “home” until my parents retired – whether I was living in Sydney, Perth, London, Toronto … When my parents sold the farm and moved to Queensland to retire, I was all of a sudden “homeless”, and felt totally rootless. Their new home, whenever I visited, or in fact lived in as their carer, was never “home”. At one point in my 40s I thought home was wherever I lived with my partner, but when our 20-some year marriage ended, I was again “homeless”. Now living in Sri Lanka, which has been a sort of surrogate, emotional home for a couple of decades, I’ve at last discovered that “home” is where my view of the world is implicitly understood, where I not only understand the words, but also their subtext, where jokes and humour and the things that motivate me come from a well of shared, or common experiences. Terrifyingly, excitedly, I have at last embraced Australia as my “home”. Now all I have to do is decide where!

    June 5, 2012
    • I agree with you there Wanderlust. I was born and raised in Pakistan, with my family split across India and Pakistan. Undergraduate school in the US, graduate in Switzerland, but at the end of the day, after nearly fifteen years outside, home is still Pakistan. And the main reason is what you talked about. I feel understood in Pakistan. Whereas, I always felt like I had to explain myself in the US and Switzerland. And since South Asians love to travel, I find many Pakistanis like me whenever I go home, whereas I did not find more than a handful of South Asians like me in Switzerland.

      June 6, 2012
      • That’s very interesting, funnyphuppo. And I think true of most of us – South Asians, Australians, New Zealanders. Certainly I’ve found, no matter how much I love it here in Sri Lanka, I’d never be accepted as ‘one of them’ and the number of people who’re like me? Here I’m a bit of a weirdo, or a curiosity, at best, I think.

        June 15, 2012
    • Embracing Australia as your home! Terrifying indeed… Sometimes I wonder about doing that. I suppose though there is nothing like some good distance to really make you feel at home where you aren’t any more!

      June 14, 2012
      • The distance of almost a lifetime might be enough – we’ll have to see:)

        Great to read your post, and best wishes for the future to you both.

        June 15, 2012
  87. Rebeca #

    I’ve always felt like home is where you most want to be. I was born in the Caribbean but grew up here in the states. I never really felt a connection to my birthplace. My home at heart is any white sandy beach with crystal ocean water. πŸ™‚

    June 5, 2012
    • White sandy beaches are cool, but I can highly recommend black sand too, for that really stand out point of difference:
      http://www.teara.govt.nz/en/iron-and-steel/1/1

      I think I can agree with the way you put it – as home being where you most want to be. Thanks for sharing your thoughts!

      June 14, 2012
  88. Home is definitely not where you were born. I’m a third culture kid, so basically though I was born in my own country, I was barely 3 when we moved abroad. The rest of my childhood was spent in Kenya, Cambodia and Zambia. And we left Zambia recently and headed back to our country. I’ve been in my country for 7 years now but I still can’t call it home. I feel too alienated and different from the rest of the population. For me home is where my parents are, and though now we’ve left Zambia for good (it was inevitable), I still feel that was ‘home’ in its truest sense for me.
    Great post and photos! Congratulations for being on Freshly Pressed!!!!!!

    June 5, 2012
    • I think it’s pretty common for at least one home to be where your parents are. I am not sure how I will feel about that when (if?) my parents ever move to some other place. I guess I just hope its an awesome place! Glad you enjoyed reading, and that you liked the photos. Thanks for the comment!

      June 14, 2012
  89. I am slowly coming to terms with the fact home, externally, is transient and that I truly am a wandering Jew. Having called four places home, I’ve moved on whims rather than necessity or work. While my soul wanders, it grows to fit into new spaces, making me a better person, fulfilling a craving for change and challenge. I wonder when and where my new home will beckon.

    June 5, 2012
    • It seems that home finds you in advance! That makes you and me something of opposites. I like the wandering, for sure. But home comes later for me. It’s really great getting to hear new points of view though, thanks for taking the time to write!

      June 14, 2012
  90. Breathtaking photographs! Though I now live in Pensacola, Florida, I still consider Mobile, Alabama my true home–not just because I was born there, but because I was raised there. It seems to depend on how much time you spent where you were born. My dad was born in Rochester, New York–but he lived most of his childhood and adolescence in Pensacola, Florida, so he considers this city his true home. Likewise, my mom was born in Tampa, Florida, but she lived most her childhood and adolescence in Pensacola, Florida also, and considers this city her true home.

    June 5, 2012
    • The most amazing thing seems to be how everyone constructs these things a little differently! Thanks for giving your experience here…I suppose for your family Pensacola, Florida (is there another Pensacola? I am not super-great at US geography, outside of states, and some of their capitals…)

      June 14, 2012
  91. I was born in Australia but have also lived in England, Canada, briefly back to Australia and now in the USA. I have traveled and moved so much in my life that for me, home is where I am. It’s not dictated by people or the past. The places I have lived and visited have shaped who I am, but my home is where I have currently made a nest for myself to live in.

    June 5, 2012
    • That would be pretty handy for those moments I find myself longing for a coffee from Fuel, a cocktail from Hooch, or a good look at the only giant squid anywhere…Have you always felt that way about “home”? Or is it more of the way you developed?

      June 14, 2012
  92. Thank you for posting

    June 5, 2012
  93. Home is where you want to be!
    Love the post!

    June 5, 2012
  94. I have also wonder about the concept of ‘home’ and have in fact put my thoughts into a blog of my own (see http://andthatzmystory.wordpress.com/?s=contentment). I have come to the conclusion that home is where one can be content, not necessarily a place at all, but more a frame of mind.

    June 5, 2012
    • I think we are reflecting the same concerns in our posts about home. Quite a complicated set os issues.

      June 14, 2012
  95. Ayu Mustika #

    nice post and [pict ..am very happy to viist in this blog…greetings all for me

    http://batu-mustika.indonetwork.co.id/mustika-pengasihan

    June 5, 2012
  96. no………….ive lived many miles away from my birthplace since i was three years of age…over 40 years ago…….im not south african by birth …im british……but in almost in every other way a south african and this is my home………..yet i still identify with my cultural heritage and consider myself to be british and that too is my home………strange im a kind of double person……………..but home is where you live…………..

    June 5, 2012
  97. Home is mobile concept for me. When I was at university home was my parents house. This was never the house I was born in which was destroyed when I was five years old. Once I had my own house and job, home became where I lived. I now live in France. Some ex-pats refer to their original country as ‘home’. I never do. For me here is home.

    June 5, 2012
    • Studying expatriate views of “home” can be pretty interesting. Age seems to be a big factor with whether “home” is where you are from or not – not to mention how long you have been away. Students also seem to share your experience – home is both your parents house (where there is food!) and also where you are studying… thanks for sharing your thoughts!

      June 14, 2012
  98. Alicia #

    “HOME” is not the place where you were born…I was born in Ecuador, my dad is Italian/Uruguayan, my mom Argentinian…we lived all over South America when I was growing up and the last few years I lived all over Eastern Europe…now I live in Italy and I feel like none of these countries are home, not really! Home is a place inside your heart! πŸ˜€

    June 5, 2012
    • I am starting to wonder if the home I described is the literal, on-the-map Wellington, or more of an intellectual, metaphysical construction. Perhaps, if it is the latter, then I can agree, home is where the heart is. Thanks for taking the time to leave a comment.

      June 14, 2012
  99. interesting!

    June 5, 2012
  100. machisan #

    great home.

    June 5, 2012
  101. I think there are two types of people – the travellers and those who stay put – cain and abel, ant and grasshopper. there is also a long tradition of people moving in search of work, and of course anyone of British ancestry has a strong tradition of sea travel. The notion of home is very strong in Germany – their word is Heimat which is a sense of where you belong as well as the physical place. I think those of us born in places like Oz and New Zealand have always been looking elsewhere, so we cling to what we have never really belonged to. Or not. good, thoughtful post. cheers

    June 5, 2012
  102. I was born in Hungary and arrived in Australia with my parents at age 4. My parents were in their thirties and struggled with Australia. I think I found it magical right from the start but I never /felt/ as if I was Australian until I spent a year travelling in Europe at 21.

    I loved my relatives and I loved Europe but there came a time when I longed for great big open spaces without fences or villages every few miles. And I longed for that distinctive colour in the sky that you don’t get in Europe. So I came home, to Australia.

    For me it’s not nationalistic but rather a love of country that must be a little bit like what our indigenous peoples feel. My place. My history.

    June 5, 2012
    • I absolutely know what you mean about the colour of the sky. I am always struck by that when you look at early paintings by Europeans in Australia, because they just can’t get the colour right. On the other hand, I don’t miss the sun that burns after 15 minutes.

      I think travel is the most important thing in finding home – how can you ever know if the home you have is the right one, if you don’t explore the possibilities in another place?

      Great comment, thanks!

      June 14, 2012
      • Thank you. πŸ˜€ I tend to tan instead of burning but in mid summer I stay well out of the sun during the ‘bad’ hours. I think all aussies should be able to take a siesta in the middle of the day… for health reason only of course.

        June 15, 2012
  103. Omer Kako #

    HOME!

    This word is strange for me, Because i don’t have a HOME

    I live in Iraq, Everyone know how Iraq is.

    HOME is the place that you comfort of,

    I hope to find my HOME soon.

    June 5, 2012
    • I hope you find a home soon too – perhaps it takes some time, but I am sure that even in Iraq homes can be made. Looking at your blog, it looks like you are keen to make them for others too!

      June 14, 2012
      • Omer Kako #

        Thanks πŸ™‚

        June 17, 2012
  104. I was born in Hong Kong, went to school in Scotland, lived in London for 10 years and now back in Scotland. I think home is where you are most comfortable and a place that no matter what you can always go back to in times of need.

    June 5, 2012
    • I like the sense of home as retreat – a place to revive, but also a place to go when life is a struggle. I am getting ever-so-much-more nuanced in my attitude to home. Do you ever miss London?

      June 14, 2012
      • No not really, having lived in Hong Kong, Edinburgh and London I really don’t mind now living in the countryside…my retreat as you say. Every time I have gone back to London on business I have been happy to leave again.

        June 15, 2012
  105. Happy
    Only one God
    Me and my husband
    Everyone that I love

    June 5, 2012
  106. Home is where you make it. I was born in Cuba, but my family immigrated to the U.S. when I was two. Cuba has never been home to me; Miami has been. And now I’m preparing to move to Australia and make that home. Funny; I recently explored this topic in a post on expats and immigrants (http://stumbledownunder.com/2012/05/19/expats-immigrants/).

    June 5, 2012
    • A few other people have written about this too – I am not sure how I qualify. I never felt like an immigrant in New Zealand (except in matters of sport), but I suppose technically I was. Now, sometimes I feel almost more of a Kiwi than Australian (my Kiwi colleague certainly prefers me to think that way, not to mention my wife…).

      I am an expat in the Netherlands, but that just sounds weird! I prefer to think of this as just returning to a home I didn’t have yet, even if that contradicts much of what I wrote earlier (I always reserve the right to contradict).

      Incidentally, I liked your picture of Gertrude Stein (A home is a home is a home; aplogies to Stein).

      June 14, 2012
      • Thanks. And I love your comment about returning to a home you didn’t have yet. That’s a beautiful sentiment.

        June 15, 2012
  107. I try to take the concept of “home” with me when I move to new places. When I say “I’m going home” it means I’m going to the place where I currently am settled, not to the place where I was born. I try to create an affinity with the place I live in, so it feels like I have a connection to the city beyond merely being housed there.

    Then of course there is the question of where do I feel strongest affinity to. Born in a small village in Scotland I studied in Edinburgh, the capital, and made that my base. Then I spent a year in Philadelphia. Despite having since spent time back in Edinburgh and in Basel…mentally I don’t think I’ve left Philly behind. I belong more to Philadelphia than Scotland…

    June 5, 2012
    • I feel at home in Edinburgh – I still have family living around there (it’s where my Dad was born). I love the castle looming over everything, Arthur’s Seat (I won’t even start with how fascinated and confused I was as a teenager fascinated by these things, with what an English hero was doing in Scotland)

      I also like the sound of a place that caught you by surprise. I think that’s what I mean when I am writing about Wellington. Thanks for sharing – your comment really has made me think more about what I might have meant in the first place!

      June 14, 2012
  108. Oh how I used to reject the notion of me being an Ohian (from the countryside outside of Columbus, Ohio) since we are frequently the butt of jokes in the United States. I moved around the world: Asia, Europe, Canada, more sophisticated American cities like Chicago and then settled back in my place of birth, small town Ohio! Well, it’s gorgeous here, since i became an “outdoor person”, I appreciate it’s natural beauty. I still feel a piece of me resides in some other places on earth though.

    June 5, 2012
    • Going away and coming back really help to settle the notion of home, I think. It can also need some personal development, as you have felt. Canberra is also a great place for the outdoors type, Wellington too. One thing I love about both citites is that they are cities, but you never have to go far to find something a little bit wild.

      Thanks for the comment!

      June 14, 2012
      • Sounds like where I live in Ohio. I can get to Columbus in 45 minutes and it’s a great city, about 2-3 million people. Or I can go north and south and get into isolation in the forests, even in my own 10 mile range I can be on forest trails for running and hiking daily. Perfect.

        June 15, 2012
  109. I don’t feel at home at home and I feel more at home when I’m not at home. Make sense? πŸ˜‰

    Steven Wade, Edinburgh and Dundee.

    June 5, 2012
  110. “home” can change over and over….it is where you are comfortable…it is where you lay your head…it is where your friends and loved ones are (usually not always)….home is sometimes just where you live, and sometimes it’s halfway across the world and you can only wish you were there…I guess it’s different for everyone…For me, home is a short walk from some ocean shore with the smell of salt in the air and hot pavement and sand under my bare feet…I’ll get there one day.

    June 5, 2012
    • I can recommend the beaches of Northern NSW, you’ll get everything you’re after there. Good luck finding that particular home!

      I agree as well, home is a flexible concept, and sometimes it is all those things you say at once. It can be pretty confusing!

      June 16, 2012
  111. I think home is just where you feel comfortable and in peace with yourself and other people.. no matter whcich country you were born or you lived.. nice post!

    June 5, 2012
    • Glad you liked the post, and yes, and peace does seem to be necessary element of “home” in its abstract sense. Thanks for leaving a comment!

      June 16, 2012
  112. Home is the place you feel safe, loved and comfortable, it might be where u were born, or where u have spent most of your life. Home is whatever Home is to you! Great post!

    June 5, 2012
    • Thanks a lot! It’s been really interesting to read how so many people define home. I have noticed that what you say might just be the most true: for everyone home is what home is for them.

      That’s how I would summarise every comment on this post, I think. Nice one.

      June 16, 2012
  113. i think home is where you feel comfortable.i was born in kakamega but right now i stay in nairobi kenya.but i think my home is kakamega because i like the place than nairobi

    June 5, 2012
    • I agree, it’s hard to call someplace home if you don’t really like it!

      June 16, 2012
  114. Home is where you work, live, and play. Where I’m from will always have my heart though!

    June 5, 2012
    • If you hold (as I now know, many do) that home is where your heart is, then it’s an interesting thing, to resolve what you say (where you’re from has the heart – but where you are is home).

      Still, I hold that both things can be true at once, and that contradiction is okay, as long as it is not hypocrisy!

      June 16, 2012
  115. A topic I’ve also explored in my writing – it’s obviously a topic that ‘hits home’ for many… Amazing how many people ‘belong nowhere yet everywhere’, and I love your comment about nationalism.

    June 5, 2012
    • Yeah, the nationalism thing seems to have struck a chord. I never really thought much about it as I wrote it, but draping the flag around yourself often seems like an act of insecurity to me. I wonder if the growing influence of easy travel and globalisation has produced the conditions for excessive nationalism (as people lack certainty about local identity against an influx of immigrants); whilst also making it straightforward to move (and hence belong somewhere new).

      Thanks for the comment! Have you got any specific home/identity posts you could link me to?

      June 16, 2012
    • Well, I found this link – but I think I originally saw it mentioned at the bottom of your blog (a Pingit? – not sure if you see it yourself when you write your blog, though)… Here it is, anyway:

      http://joyfullantidotes.wordpress.com/2012/06/05/home-is-where-the-heart-is/#comment-110

      I put the writer onto your blog, too.

      June 21, 2012
  116. Great post! I too have moved (and travelled) a lot and have come to the conclusion that in some ways home is more a state of mind and a way of being rather than a particular location. Thanks for exploring the concept so well.

    June 5, 2012
    • Thanks for the positive feedback. It’s a difficult subject to explore, and I have to say it’s been a very strange experience to have seen so many people react on the subject! I agree that “home” is sometimes about an attitude more than it is a place. We sometimes try to cultivate a sense of Wellington here in the Netherlands, which usually involves some kind of reimagining what is in front of you.

      Great comment, thank you.

      June 16, 2012
  117. very interesting point. i tend to believe in a old hip-hop saying. “it ain’t where ya from, it’s where ya at” since im from and still live in Brooklyn it’s much easier for me to say where my home is.

    June 5, 2012
    • It seems like being from Brooklyn also generates its own pretty special sense of identity – I love the writing of a Brooklyn-boy Jonathan Lethem, who moved to a pre-gentrified part of Brooklyn, and writes sometimes about how he coped as the only white boy growing up in predominantly black neighbourhoods. For this reason, Brooklyn looms large in its own way in my imagination.

      And, now that I have been there (I was there in January!) it’s made it’s own contribution to my sense of home.

      I love the old hiphop saying, I never heard that before. Thanks for sharing!

      June 16, 2012
  118. I had read your post, its interesting about your life, Thanks for sharing
    Harmandeep Singh..

    June 5, 2012
  119. I enjoyed reading your post. I also believe there is a “home” we carry inside of us. It travels with us to whatever geographic location we call home. The rooms we decorate in our homes are just as important as how we decorate our inner home. What we tell ourselves about ourselves, how we perceive events, who we choose to include into our lives, as well as, the vibe we allow to li ve and grow within our physical home.

    June 5, 2012
  120. Born in New Jersey and raised in the suburbs of NYC. We moved once in the same town… about a half mile away from our old house. So home to me is specifically the town I grew up in. My father is from France though and I have family scattered all over France. Do I feel at home in France? It’s an interesting question–I speak the language and my French family is cool but I don’t know if I could ever live there permanently.

    Been living in Madrid, Spain the past 2 years and it has started to feel like home. But I’m going back to NY in a few months. πŸ™‚ Who knows where I’ll end up though!

    June 5, 2012
    • Home is such a great idea, I think. I am jealous you speak French! Je ne parle pa francais, even though I spent all of highschool trying to get to grips with it (I now speak a bit of Dutch, and have, as a result, huge issues with the way languages are taught in school. Okay, I have drifted off topic now).

      Thanks for sharing your thoughts on my post, and your story!

      June 16, 2012
  121. I love this post. I live in the same city I was born in and through the little travel I’ve been able to do have found that there are other places that feel more like home than where I’m from. Home really is where you are most comfortable and at ease.

    June 5, 2012
    • I think the most important thing is to interrogate notions of home – just because you were born somewhere (and let’s admit it, no one asks to be born anywhere!) doesn’t mean you have to accept the sense of that place as home unless you want to!

      Thanks so much for leaving a comment, and for taking the time to read my post.

      June 16, 2012
  122. I have moved around a few times. Some of the places I have lived have never really felt like home. Where I am now is home. But is it where my heart is?

    Congrats on Freshly Pressed.

    June 5, 2012
    • Freshly pressed is something else – especially on a post I really thought only my family and maybe a few dedicated friends would ever see!

      I think home gets more complicated every time you move to a new place. But the complication is part of the joy, I think. At least, it can be…

      Thanks for reading, for stopping long enough to leave a remark.

      June 16, 2012
  123. Great post and food for thought. Congrats on being Freshly Pressed!

    I grew up and still live in a suburb of Washington, DC and home is something I have struggled with for a very long time. I remember my father having to go on a business trip to Colorado when I was young and he took the family with him and I instantly felt comfortable — like I was home. It was as if this was the place I supposed to be. Ironically even before that trip to Colorado, I never felt comfortable in Maryland. I never felt as if this was where I supposed to be. And truthfully there is no reason for me stay here, well except family.

    I do not subscribe to that old adage home is where you make it. I truly believe the adage home is where the heart is.

    June 5, 2012
    • It’s funny how a sense of home can exist, or stanger still, not exist even from a young age. It’s also strange that as a species, we invest so much of ourselves into the thought of a place about which we are unable to choose, or change, anything.

      For you I suppose the trick will be to find where your heart is! Good luck, and thanks for the comment.

      June 16, 2012
  124. Home’s with that safety feeling where you dont have to feel you don’t belong. Somewhere that everything that matters to you is with you. And you can keep moving on, if that’s how you choose to get along.

    June 5, 2012
    • I am not sure how much I have been able to choose where the place that most feels like home has been – it’s more how much I become aware of it, the sense that home has changed. It seems as well I only notice when I am looking back.

      Thanks for the thoughtful comment!

      June 16, 2012
  125. Home is where you’re most happy. I was born in New York to one American and one British parent. I’ve lived in London since 2007 and last year in Colombia for six months. I’m back in London now because it feels right to me. Perhaps sometime in the future home will feel like a completely different country. I think it’s a feeling rather than a place.

    June 5, 2012
    • I suppose for many people at different times, home has even been a place they never saw, or perhaps might even see – feelings of patriotism and Empire could confuse these. Home is definitely feeling, rather than place; for me, the important thing is to think about what home could mean, and why it is that one place, rather than another feels more comfortable.

      Why, then, is a more pertinent question than where.

      I love London too – it really is a city with an aura.

      June 16, 2012
  126. John Saddington #

    Reblogged this on 8BIT.

    June 5, 2012
  127. Roshni #

    The place I call home happens to be the place where I was born. But, I guess, home, essentially, is the place where you find happiness and peace of mind. Where you are you!

    June 5, 2012
    • I think you have hit the nail on the head with this comment! Thanks for reading, and leaving your thoughts.

      June 16, 2012
  128. I totally agree. Home is the place where you live and you have lived for a while, the place where you feel safe and happy.

    June 5, 2012
    • Safe and happy is right – thought I guess with earthquakes and high winds, Wellington also offers a frisson of danger!

      Thanks for the comment!

      June 18, 2012
  129. Hmm. I haven’t found my home yet. It’s still in my head. Though I believe I’ll find it momentarily.

    June 6, 2012
  130. Great post. check out our adventure at
    atruetalltale.wordpress.com

    June 6, 2012
  131. Home is where you feel most comfortable.
    Being a Β£10 pom from Yorkshire and living all over Australia, Brunei, and back I have yet to find somewhere to truly call Home…I have moved 45 times, but I still feel at home with my darling wife, wherever we may be.
    Great article and thought provoking too.

    June 6, 2012
    • If I provoked even a small thought in some readers, I feel very humbled by the experience. Thank you for the comment! 45 times is a prodigious number of moves, what’s the story there?! I can relate to feeling at home where your wife is – this will always be true for me as well.

      June 18, 2012
      • Lots of job moves, both when growing with parents and myself, I was in the air force for a little while…So no, it’s not on the run πŸ™‚

        June 18, 2012
  132. Ah, this has been one of the greatest questions of my life, ever since my parents moved me from the Czech Rep. to Canada…still don’t quite have an answer…I guess, you can’t ever deny what you lived in your formative years…:)

    June 6, 2012
    • What has been lovely to discover is how the formative years seem so different for everyone – sometimes university, sometimes schoolage, sometimes younger, or older! I love that the question has so many answers (and the funny thing is, for us all, isn’t the question rhetorical?).

      June 18, 2012
  133. jamesroom964x #

    Really insightful post. During college, I first started thinking about the concept of home, when I came back to my parent’s house and I felt like I was visiting. I started referring to school as home, and my apartment as my house. I think I did that because my life was there, my friends were there, and all the things I really cared about were there. Now that I’m out of school, I’ll be moving around quite a bit for work for the next few years, so home is going to change a lot for me, but I think it will always be the place where there are people I want to be with.

    June 6, 2012
    • Sometimes when I talk about home, I mean where my Mum and Dad are, to this very day. This doesn’t happen as much, but it still happens. More often, as in this post, home is WGTN, and more often still home is here, in Leiden.

      What is amazing is the capacity of the mind to be flexible enough to hold all these contradictory notions all at once, without any sense of dissonance.

      If there’s noone cool around, I agree, it’s not any kind of home. Great comment, thanks!

      June 18, 2012
  134. Wow, thank you for your sharing your home town is very beautiful

    June 6, 2012
    • Everyone should go to New Zealand once, by blog if not in person! Thanks for commenting!

      June 18, 2012
  135. That’s funny I was thinking about that recently. I never felt like I knew where my home was because I moved around so much. But now I realize it took me so much moving around to realize where my home is. And now that’s in Vancouver, Canada, because it just feels right to be here. It also took me two hard years trying to live in Europe to figure that out!! Great article!

    June 6, 2012
    • You are not the only person I’ve heard about who had to struggle along somewhere to figure that home was somewhere else. It’s also strange how a place which at first feels like an odd fit can end up sitting snugly around you.

      Incidentally, what’s the best thing I can ever see in Vancouver? I’ve heard good things, but there’s nothing like insider local knowledge, eh?

      Thanks for the comment!

      June 18, 2012
      • Totally! I never thought Vancouver would feel like home!

        Fun stuff to do in Van:
        Ground Grind (hike up Grouse Mountain)
        Dragon Boat racing
        Richmond Night Market
        Guilt and Co. (Cool pub where you can play life sized Jenga)
        Ambleside beach in West Vancouver (if you have a dog this park is awesome!)

        Are you planning to visit Vancouver?

        June 21, 2012
  136. I agree, the NGA in Canberra is pretty marvellous but I could never imagine Canberra to be homely. Love that you made me think about where my home is. Cheers Sue

    June 6, 2012
    • I guess you had to grow up there – for me it’ll always be a little bit homely. Marvellous things like the NGA make it so for me, as well as others: Gypsy Bar (RIP); Lake Burley Griffin; Impact Records (RIP); ACTION buses (oh dear). And I mean come on, the Parliamentary Triangle!

      Thanks for commenting, and also glad to know others share my NGA enthusiasm!

      June 18, 2012
  137. Where is home? What makes a place home? These are my questions too.

    I believe the answers are far more complex than some of the responses suggest, however comforting the notion of a simple answer might be. If I ever work it out, I’ll let you know.

    My childhood was spent in one place (Adelaide), which was pleasant enough but I never really connected with it. I left within a month of finishing University (20 years ago) and since then I’ve ‘tried on’ most bits of Australia for size. I’ve enjoyed the experience, but still nowhere really feels like ‘home’.

    As I type, my bags are packed for the next adventure: Europe. It’s where my family roots are (some generations back) so perhaps there’s a connection there? I can’t describe what I’m after, but I think it’s definitely about connecting with ‘place’ – possibly a culture as well. I’m excited about the prospect of finding it, no matter how crazy some people think that sounds.

    And if I never find it, the quest itself is enjoyable in its own right.

    Good luck with yours.

    June 6, 2012
    • Questing is an important element (there’s a reason why that kind of story is so important!). Without some element of examination, either internal, external or both, I am not convinced you can really be “home”; how would you ever know if you didn’t look around?

      Going to live in Europe? Or just have a look around? Thanks for sharing, and the first thing you say is true too – home is complicated!

      Great comment.

      June 19, 2012
  138. home is where you are happiest, and have the people and things you love πŸ™‚
    i was born in egypt, lived my first 6 years there. moved to switzerland until i was 18, then back to egypt for a year, and from there to austria, vienna since 2006. i’ve been living in vienna for 6 years now, and i call it home. although i remember times where home was switzerland, and respectively egypt… home is not a set, fixed place, it’s flexible and volatile .
    x

    June 6, 2012
    • A volatile home – I suppose Egypt would qualify, unfortunately, in more ways than one, lately. But you are right about home being flexible.

      What a wonderful world we live in though, that so many of us get to try living in so many different places!

      June 19, 2012
  139. G’day fellow Aussie! I’ve just written a draft blog along a similar theme, as I’m currently travelling around this big brown flat land of ours.. will be published soon (I hope).. follow me & check it out if you like. For me, home is where your heart is – be it your original home town, a new home town or in my case, a cosy caravan moving location every week with my beloved and two darlings accompanying me! Keep up the great blogging! Kate x

    June 6, 2012
    • I might have missed your home post? Or maybe it is still pending? Either way, I’d love to read it. Home is so intriguing!

      I am not sure I could ever call a caravan home, though I am quite keen to see more of Australia, particularly that big empty middle bit.

      Glad you liked the post, and thanks for the comment!

      June 19, 2012
  140. cortezsharkman #

    Home is where you want to go back to. Home is the place you brag about. Home may not be where your living room is. For me home is Hawaii. Born and lived 1960-1985.
    Marisa
    http://www.steppinginto thewater.wordpress.com

    June 6, 2012
    • Anything about Hawaii grab you in particular? I mean, for me, never having been there, I guess I would think the beaches etc; but perhaps there’s more to it?

      I like the idea of home as somewhere to brag about. I’ll hold on to that one. Thanks a lot!

      And thanks for commenting.

      June 19, 2012
      • cortezsharkman #

        Hawaii has a magic about it, a spirit, if you will. I knew this even as a small child, looking up into the unreachable mist-covered mountains, allowing myself to be hypmotized by their beauty. Listen to some Hawaiian music sometime, the magic, Hawaiian spirit, ohana shines through.

        June 20, 2012
  141. Great pictures….

    June 6, 2012
  142. For me home is where I were born. But maybe in 20 or 30 years, my home is at a another place:

    β€œHome, home again.
    I like to be here when I can.
    When I come home cold and tired
    It’s good to warm my bones beside the fire…”

    (Breathe Reprise – Pink Floyd)

    June 6, 2012
    • If home doesn’t evolve, it’s probably time to start thinking about yourself more seriously, I think. Even when you are staying in the same place, it seems to me that surely you should be seeing it differently?

      I have to say though, I am completely in agreeance with the quote.

      June 19, 2012
  143. Home can be the same place your entire life or a different place every day, a la Gypsy style.

    At the end of the day, when you lock the windows and door, turn the lights out and call it the night, that’s home. Additionally, the people inside these walls is your family (These people can change too!) Of course, this is a bit generalized and not including temporary trips, hotel stays nor overnight guests to your place, and by “family” I meant immediate close relatives, you know what I mean.

    Excellent read, thank you!

    June 6, 2012
    • I am glad you liked the post, and thanks a lot for leaving a comment! Family is, I agree, central to some conception of home. Perhaps it is as your family (and of course, I use the term loosely too!) changes, home must change with it!

      June 19, 2012
  144. Personally, I believe that where you LIVE is your home, but not where you were born.
    I was born in Chicago, and recently went back to visit a friend, but the city seemed completely strange to me, as if I had never interacted with it.

    You need to LIVE in a place long enough to make a connection with it, whether it be to a good or a bad thing, before you can really call it any kind of home.

    June 6, 2012
    • Homes change when we’re not in them, right? There’s something reassuring about knowing your way around streets though. I like even though I have not been going back to Canberra for years, I know I can get in a car and drive around without a map.

      Not needing a map makes a place a little home-like I think.

      June 19, 2012
  145. home is where your personality and sensibilities are the majority.

    June 6, 2012
  146. TERRIfic Words #

    This is post so timely. I was just having a conversation with my parents about this. My parents who were born and raised in Trinidad still call it home even though they have lived in the US. for 20+ years now. I guess home is where your heart first grew to them.

    June 6, 2012
    • I suppose there is sometimes something deeply cultural about home too, and perhaps Trinidad offers something to your parents the US cannot provide! I read a book once, The Namesake (Jhumpa Lahiri) about second generation Indians in the US, who struggle with home, and identity.

      I really like that last line, and that’s how home seems to work for me.

      Thanks for the comment!

      June 19, 2012
  147. my definition of home is where your heart is.
    love your post!

    June 7, 2012
  148. I’ve lived abroad since I was four, and now I think of every place that I’ve lived in and traveled to as a sort of home.

    June 7, 2012
    • I hope I managed to convey something similar? It’s amazing how such a small question in the title can really set off so many thoughts! I think even a short stay in a new place can contribute to a sense of home, as you can always measure “home” against “away”; not in the sense that one is better, but the nice thing about seeing home differently is appreciating what was invisible before.

      Thanks for the comment!

      June 19, 2012
  149. I was born in Wales and emigrated to Australia with my family at 13 in 1970. I went back to Wales in 2006 for the first time and felt like I was “home”. It was quite an amazing feeling. Ten years ago I became reacquainted with an old school friend from Wales. I have just left my “home” and my family in Australia to settle with him in the UK after a long distance relationship of a couple of years. I have dual nationality, two passports and two homes and sometimes wish I could be in two places at one time! Great post. Congratulations on being Freshly Pressed. πŸ™‚

    June 8, 2012
    • I am glad you liked the post, and wow, that it’s taken so long to reply is something to do with the demands of Freshly Pressed (not to mention our committment to a post-a-day average; working; and life in general!).

      It’s interesting how for some that early memory sets in, and a later return can spark a feeling of homeliness. Dual nationality is super-handy! Though for me, I don’t suppose I will ever feel British, as such.

      Thanks for the comment!

      June 19, 2012
  150. home is where your heart is

    June 9, 2012
  151. Home is, in my eyes, where you fell you home… πŸ˜‰

    I am danish and fell me home there – but mostly I live and work aboard – these 4-5 other countries I fell is my second home… πŸ˜‰

    June 9, 2012
    • I agree – you absolutely can have more than one home. It’s nice to be comfortable in many places. (CIA, incidentally, studied in Copenhagen for a while, so for her, Denmark is something of a home for her!)

      Thanks for leaving your comment.

      June 23, 2012
  152. annmariedavidson #

    Loved this sentiment. I was born in Michigan and ended up in Texas at the age of 18. More of my growing occurred here, and going back to Michigan feels flat and empty now. I realize I was just born in the wrong state! Cheers, Annmarie

    June 10, 2012
    • Home is about feeling authentic, and since you can’t choose where you’re born, it’s great to be able to find a place which lets you feel that way.

      I am glad you found that place! Thanks a lot for commenting.

      June 23, 2012
  153. TheRebeccaProject #

    Sydney is where I was born and San Francisco is where my current home is. As for where I belong, I’m still searching for it. But I see ‘home’ as an interesting concept, but one I’m still trying to work out. Loved your post!

    June 10, 2012
    • Really glad you liked the post. I think we are all always searching for home, but as long as you have some sense of it, then you’ll be okay, right? How is it living in San Francisco? I’ve never been, but lots of people have said it’s the kind of place in which I might feel at home…

      June 23, 2012
      • It’s very similar to Sydney in so many ways, and not at all like it in others. But I felt comfortable as soon as I arrived. It’s a fantastic town. You should come visit!

        June 27, 2012
    • When we have the wherewithall, a visit to San Franciso sounds great. I read a book (the Golden Gate, Vikram Seth – it’s entirely in Pushkin sonnets, the man is an amazing genius, I digress) that has me loving the idea of the place, and my sister and mother-in-law (weird to write that, still there it is) both loved it too. So.

      The only question now is (actually there are several, but still) which bank to rob? (For anyone reading from any government anywhere, the bank robbing thing is a joke, okay?) Excuse my paranoia!

      PS: we want to go to Iceland too (and the tiny house on the isolated island surely has Hyperballad written all over it).

      July 2, 2012
  154. Interesting read and great question.

    June 10, 2012
  155. I am really comforted by your entry because I am returning to my birthplace after being 6 months elsewhere. 6 months gave me ample time to establish a home and going back actually scares me. Hopefully it does get better soon!

    June 11, 2012
    • Wow, if it’s not strange for me to give advice, I wouldn’t worry too much. Establishing your own home is so important in life, but as several people have written here, the place you were born, grew up in, or where your parents are remains a kind of home forever!

      I am glad you enjoyed the post though. Thanks for commenting, and good luck!

      June 23, 2012
  156. Great post and a compelling question that I struggle with having lived in more places than I can count, including 5 different countries. I seem to lack that deep attachment or affection to any one place. I enjoy some things – and dislike others, wherever I am. People ask me whether I long to return to Canada (my birth country) and I am no more inspired to be there than anywhere else. It’s not because Canada isn’t a fabulous country … its just I don’t feel rooted anywhere. Where I am (Australia these days) is as good as … Canada, which is as good as the US, which is as good as Scotland, the UK or anywhere. I have waited to have this magical *click* with place, but it has never happened.

    June 11, 2012
    • I suppose it’s only a retrospective “click” for me. It’s not being in a place that helped me recognise how it has grown into a home. There are things I miss, for example, about Wellington that are not really very special or important (or even intrinsic to Wellington); but I miss the place and I miss those things in that place.

      I agree, almost any, and almost every place is as good as any other. But a home is as much about memory, about people and about emotion as it is about any “place” right?

      Perhaps you click with every place? What a blessing that could be too!

      Thanks for the comment, and for reading my small thoughts on home…

      June 23, 2012
  157. I think home is were you feel comfortable. We moved a lot when I was a child and so I have a hard time telling anyone exactly where I am from. From our travels my husband and I have actually decided that we think of our camper more like our home because it is were we are the most comforted.

    June 11, 2012
    • A moveable home might just be the best thing ever! Wherever you are, there’s home. Nice. I like to say I am an Australian New Zealander living in Holland, whatever that means. That way, I have a bet on each of the places which have a claim on me, so that I get to have a claim on them too. Is that cheating?

      June 23, 2012
  158. I think home is where the majority of you growing up experiences happen. Whether or not you like the place, i believe, has nothing to do with it.

    June 11, 2012
    • This is a completely true statement – though I guess it would be better if you can like your home. After all, isn’t that why the whole “there’s no place like home” three clicks and you are there thing is so big in people’s minds?

      June 23, 2012
  159. getyerwitsoutforthelads #

    I really enjoyed reading your post, and congratulations on being selected for Freshly Pressed! I lived in Dublin for half of my life (well nearly, I’ll be 22 in autumn), but I really do find where I have been living for the past ten and a half years is my home without a doubt. I think home is where it’s right to be in your mind; where you automatically think of when you say the word. It’s the place where you feel at ease, not necessarily the place where you’re happiest at any given time but really where you’re yourself the most. Congratulations again on a really great post. πŸ™‚
    Conor
    http://getyerwitsoutforthelads.wordpress.com/

    June 11, 2012
    • Thanks, and really glad you liked the post. I like the idea you put forward – that home is where you can be yourself more than anywhere else. I think that’s quite true. So, thanks for reading, and for taking some time to write a thoughtful comment. πŸ™‚

      June 23, 2012
  160. for me home is where I live, it changes every once in a while, and getting used to a new place is hard, but you get so much out of it.. where was your favorite home?

    June 11, 2012
    • If really pushed, I would put Wellington forward as my “favourite”, but it feels unfair; I’ve thought about this all so much since I got so many comments – but it seems homes have a way of making themselves, home, perhaps, is where you are (at least some of the time).

      But, if I am sneaky, and rephrase the question, which home do I want to go back to, the answer is a simple Wellington…

      So, now, it’s my turn to ask, where was home, where is home, where else is home, and which home would you go back to?

      (Thanks for the comment, and apologies for the much delayed reply!)

      July 1, 2012
      • Home right now is paris. I’m not french nor do I speak the language, but I know this city, where to go, where to it, I miss it when I’m away – it’s home.
        Home originally is Israel. but it’s been NY too, and Sydney, my accent is hilarious, mostly american but I have some phrase I say in aussie english πŸ™‚

        July 2, 2012
      • I love those kinds of accents! Next time we come to Paris, I’ll have to ask for some tips on where to go from someone who knows! (There’s no substitute for local knowledge, that’s for sure…)

        July 7, 2012
      • Sure, I love giving tips πŸ™‚

        July 8, 2012
  161. that’s so true dude, like gandhi have said Where there is love there is life.

    June 11, 2012
  162. Really nice post :). I think having a home in more than one place is the best thing in the world! Home isn’t where you were born, home is where you feel happy and if that’s in more than one place, all the better!!

    June 12, 2012
    • I like that more than one place holds a piece of me, as I hold pieces of them. Glad you liked the post – and sorry about taking such a long time to reply. Life, you know, and all that stuff gets in the way of blogging sometimes. At any rate, thanks for stopping by, and more thanks still for taking some time to leave a comment!

      July 1, 2012
  163. Jacob #

    Great post. I think home is wherever you feel like you belong, so it may be different places at different times. Humans have always wandered in order to find new places to call home.

    June 13, 2012
    • I find a link to New Zealand in this point too (maybe I am stetching, but bear with me?) – I sometimes think of the daring Polynesians (eventually, these ones would become Māori) who set off to find a new home in the Pacific – they surely never knew it was there?

      Glad you liked the post, and thanks a lot for the comment!

      July 1, 2012
  164. jimmywagner #

    I think anywhere you live happily would be home I never liked where I was born but love living where I live so to me I feel that’s my home. But really good post.

    June 14, 2012
    • I agree, happiness is important for a sense of home. But it’s true too, that even places you don’t like much can have a claim on a piece of you. I think, perhaps you might agree, that the most important thing about home is that you define home, and don’t let home define you…

      July 1, 2012
  165. I was born in Soviet Union, a country which does not exist for more than 20 years now. And yes, I sometimes get the feeling of having no home. Literally. In fact, I was born in one country, my origins are of another one, I spent most of my adult life in the third country and now I live in the fourth. And all of these places are homes in some ways. But since I’ve been moving around a lot during last 3-4 years, I call home the place, where I put down my backpack. And I guess I could call the whole world my home.

    June 18, 2012
    • I have often thought about the effect of being born in a place which ceased to exist, or perhaps the opposite – imagine suddenly becoming East Timorese, or South Sudanese, because a country suddenly exists?

      If home is where you backpack is, I can relate. For me, the most important thing for me to do in any new place is get some serious pavement time in, wear my shoes out a little and get some real familiarity about it. Then, even for just a few days, some small blocks become home.

      Sounds like you’ve got a solid philosophy behind you though, which is probably the best start to having a home. Perhaps you would agree?

      July 1, 2012

Trackbacks & Pingbacks

  1. Home Is Where The Heart Is « joyfullantidotes
  2. 24 hours in the world’s coolest little capital | foldedcranes
  3. Re: Is home where you’re born? | theglittermill

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