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Weekly Photo Challenge: Big

This week’s photo challenge seems so simple.

There are so many big things out there, especially coming from Australia. There’s the Big Banana, the Big Merino, the Big Prawn, the Big Pineapple; New Zealand comes to the party too, with the Big Gumboot, among other things.

We’ve seen Big Ben, too.

But all these things seem a little too easy. A little predictable. Almost everything is big, if you put it next to something else. A fire ant is big, next to a black ant. A molecule of water is big next to an atom of hydrogen. So instead I’ve chosen a big undertaking, that produced a pretty big ship, and at the end, was a big failure.

As the kid’s probably don’t say anymore: Epic Fail.

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5 Comments Post a comment
  1. Was this a Viking ship?
    P.S. Epic Fail is still ‘in’.

    October 13, 2012
    • foldedcranes #

      I would say not; evidently it was based on the design of a French warship, and was thoroughly “modern” for its time (just massively unsuccesful).

      Implicit in my reply is the assumption that by “Viking ship” you mean a clinker-built, dragon prowed vessel?

      This one was designed by a Dutch shipbuilder, as they were the eminent mariners of the day…

      October 13, 2012
  2. I saw an article in TV about this. It was fascinating and amazing! Nice take on the post.

    October 13, 2012
  3. Very cool post. Did you know, not only do we have the Big Gumboot…we have a Gumboot song ???
    Have a listen…it is so cool. And sooooooooo Kiwi.
    http://jobryantnz.wordpress.com/2011/08/09/what-makes-new-zealand-kiwi/

    October 14, 2012
    • One of the things I like best about John Clarke is that he can be appreciated in different, yet equal measure on both sides of the Tasman.

      November 1, 2012

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