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Posts tagged ‘Glass’

Peace window

It’s human rights day today. So that has me thinking about Marc Chagall‘s Peace Window on the ground floor of the United Nations headquarters building in New York City. Created in tribute to former UN Secretary General Dag Hammarskjöld and those who have lost their lives in the cause of peace, it is a beautiful piece of art with a deep message.

Marc Chagall, Peace Window, United Nations headquarters New York City

Doesn’t Chagall’s glass work look beautiful in photo form? We were also in awe of his monumental series of stained glass windows in the Fraumünster in Zurich. No photos allowed there though, so be sure to take the chance to check them out if you find yourself in Switzerland and haven’t already had the pleasure of seeing them.

CIA

Photo by CIA of Marc Chagall’s Peace Window, New York City, New York, United States, January 2012.

A sparkling piece of Slow Art

If you have already read my post from yesterday, you will know that Slow Art at the Nationalmuseum in Stockholm made a huge impression on both of us. I promised that today I would share with you the piece from the Slow Art exhibition that really stole the show for me. In fact, I think Mafune Gonjo‘s Beauty has a thorn is the most beautiful and innovative piece of sculpture I have ever seen.

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Walking in rainbows: Daniel Buren at le Grand Palais

Today I get the fun task of revealing the amazing Paris experience that we had on the final day of our recent trip (I posted a teaser yesterday!) Hopefully that post and the photo I included was enough to whet your appetite. If you are into art and in particular contemporary installation art, I can pretty much guarantee you’ll enjoy this post, and even if you are not, I think you will too (well, I hope so, at least!).

An external shot of the Grand Palais, with a billboard for Daniel Buren’s MONUMENTA 2012 show

MONUMENTA is an art project organised by the French Ministry of Culture and Communication which has been running for a couple of years now. I’d never heard of it before, and it was only by chance that we got to catch MONUMENTA 2012. Each year a different well-known international contemporary artist has been given the space of the nave in the Grand Palais to create a site-specific art work – no mean feat given that the Nave space is 13,500 square metres! Read more

The power of good architecture: entranced and enchanted at Mudam, Part 2

As I wrote about a couple of days ago, Mudam, Luxembourg’s contemporary art museum, is an architectural gem. I promised to take you inside the building, so you can see for yourself whether the building on the inside stacks up to how it looks outside.

The materials on show on the outside flow through to inside, making for gallery spaces that are in many instances beautifully lit by natural light which spills in through the large panes of glass in the roof and widows. The Grand Hall greets you soon after arrival. It is breathtaking in scale and structure, and serves as the main hub of the building, with other galleries leading off on either side and at different levels. Without a doubt, the moment I glimpsed the Grand Hall, I knew that we were in for something special.

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The power of good architecture: entranced and enchanted at Mudam

It’s not very often that you come across a building that really makes you stand up straight and take notice, and which really captures your heart and imagination. When we visited Mudam – the first and magnificent contemporary art museum in the tiny nation of Luxembourg, we experienced one of these rare instances of architectural delight.

As previously shown on foldedcranes.com, Mudam was a place that really did delight us and made us very happy. One of the first things that struck us about this building – designed by Ieoh Ming (I.M.) Pei (perhaps his most well known architectural creations being the Louvre glass pyramids in Paris) was the way in which the new building was integrated into the ramparts of the ancient fortifications which are still standing on the site. Initially when we approached Mudam we wondered if the old and new meshed together as a whole, but as we got to know the building better, we quickly saw that this was far from the case, and instead that this was a building epitomised by a sense of true balance and harmony. Read more

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