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Posts tagged ‘Nationalmuseum’

A sparkling piece of Slow Art

If you have already read my post from yesterday, you will know that Slow Art at the Nationalmuseum in Stockholm made a huge impression on both of us. I promised that today I would share with you the piece from the Slow Art exhibition that really stole the show for me. In fact, I think Mafune Gonjo‘s Beauty has a thorn is the most beautiful and innovative piece of sculpture I have ever seen.

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Not seeing how long it took is part of the intrigue…

Last week, PJD shared an in-depth glimpse into one of the art exhibitions that we have been most impressed with, ever. This was the incredible Slow Art exhibition at the Nationalmuseum, which we were lucky to find by chance when we were in Stockholm recently.

We were so surprised at the beauty of the pieces collected together in this small exhibition. In keeping with the theme, due to our captivation with what our eyes saw, we slowly took it all in.

Slow Art has really lingered in our minds; we have discussed many of the pieces we saw in the exhibition a number of times since we returned home to Leiden, reflecting on the fact that an overarching characteristic of the works was their exquisite beauty and uniqueness. So, today I thought I would share a few more of our favourite pieces. Sure, we loved them all, and the ones that PJD has already documented in his post were certainly amongst the most impressive. Yet, the depth of the quality in this small collection was quite astonishing, and these pieces really are quite something… Read more

Don’t lose your head

Sculpture amazes me, and I have stood for long periods of time in awe of the detail – in different styles – that sculptors such as Rodin, Louise Bourgeois (the sight of her Maman standing aloft in Tate Modern’s Turbine Hall still haunts me!), Michelangelo and Alberto Giacometti manage to infuse into their pieces. I also love more abstract sculpture by artists like Richard Serra and Henry Moore, which are often particularly striking through sheer size, shape and vision, rather than minute, life-like detail. Surely though, the human body must remain as one of the most challenging subjects for a sculptor. Perhaps this was one of the reasons why the two pieces of sculpture below caught my eye during our travels over the last few months, and have lingered in my mind. As you can see, both are of human heads but they are separated by centuries and vastly different stylistic techniques. Yet looking at the photos I took of them, I find them both captivating and convincing pieces of artwork, and seeing them here next to each other, I like the contrast too.

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