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Posts tagged ‘weeklyphotochallenge’

Weekly photo challenge: kiss

I’ll let the photo speak for itself.

Kiss the bride

PJD

Photo by Anna Allport. This is a week-and-a-bit early, I suppose. But it is certainly challenge appropriate.

Weekly Photo Challenge: Changing Seasons

Changing seasons?

New Zealand (and perhaps especially Auckland) is famous for four seasons in one day. Theoretically, this would make the challenge simple. Perversely, though, the trouble with rapid shifts in the weather is that it can be hard to pin down an iconic moment that marks the shift from one season to another. In Christchurch, the arrival of the migratory godwits marks the beginning of spring. But summer? Summer is elusive.

Meanwhile, we walked down to French Bay*. Today was a magnificent day. The sun glowed in a nearly cloudless sky, the trees swayed in a gentle breeze. A sign, perhaps, of the summer to come? Kauri trees struck elegant silhouettes, surrounded by smaller cabbage trees. At the beach in French Bay, there were paddle-boarders, and a handful of others sitting on the sand. After all, the season is only changing, and the water is not very warm (yet). The pohutukawa were not flowering here, but they had begun to bud – the distinctive red blossoms often flare up, bright red, for Christmas. As we walked elsewhere in Titirangi, we saw that the pohutukawa had started flowering – some trees covered in the bright blooms, others with just a few. The best moment of the afternoon came with the discovery of a swing, above a path to the beach. And next to it? A pohutukawa tree, flourishing and with the brightest flowers you can imagine.

And we realised this was it. Pohutukawa flowers represent that iconic moment: summer is here.

PJD

Photos by PJD & CIA, with invaluable assistance from Nature. All photos were taken today, as we walked around Titirangi, Auckland.

* I first heard of French Bay when I saw an amazing painting (one of several with that title) by  Titirangi artist Colin McCahon. McCahon is one of New Zealand’s best known, and most influential artists. This particular  French Bay painting is often (always? we haven’t been for a while) displayed in the Toi Te Papa (Te Papa’s art collection) on Level Four of that wonderful museum. So, it was with some excitement that I walked down to the bay for the first time today.

Some New York minutes

Our relatively spontaneous trip to New York in January (the result of stars aligning – cheap flights, accommodation with friends, an intense desire to see New York City) still sometimes feels like it was just last week. My own expectations were so high, I never thought the place could live up to them. But as is always the way with these things, it sneaks up with you in ways you don’t anticipate, even as some things seem muted when you see them up close for the first time.

Painted Cups

Painted coffee cups, hanging in the front-end of the Flatiron.

On our first day, after the Times (and the map), we made our way into the city. The Flatiron was our first point of interest. What we didn’t expect was the dazzling display of hanging, hand-painted coffee cups. They added immensely to the sense of occasion, and my excitement went into overdrive. The buildings, reflected in the glass, and visible through the glass hammered home that we were in the city of the skyscraper; we felt right at home.

MOMA, reflected

MOMA, reflected

We then covered a lot of ground on foot. We headed past the New York Public Library (we looked inside on another day), craned our necks up at the Empire State Building and the Rockefeller Center, before we arrived at MOMA.

PJD, reflected inside MOMA

PJD, reflected inside MOMA

As we wandered about, we enjoyed the inside of the building as much as the art.

Times Square

Times Square, lights reflecting everywhere

At the end of the day, we wandered back to Times Square. Because everyone has to go to Times Square. Don’t they? Even if they don’t, we did. And it was awful. And crass. And overrated. And most of all, it was awesome.

Some reflections on my first day in NYC (CIA had been before, and was lucky enough to visit again since!) only cement how much this city means to my imagination. In the end, it also affirms my sense of optimism. If New York is possible, almost anything is.

PJD

Photos by PJD or CIA. Provenance is hard to ascertain at this point. Incidentally, isn’t there some unstoppably excellent quality to this song? Or, more honestly, about its chorus?

Weekly Photo Challenge: Reflections

Luxembourg City lies at the confluence of two rivers. The remains of the old city fortifications rise ominously above the Petrusse, allowing for great reflective experimentation. Across two days, we wandered above and below the walls, along and above the river.

In the photo challenge throwdown, the following tips were given by Jared Bramblett:

Tips: Think about using different perspectives and viewing angles to modify a reflection’s impact on your composition. For beginners: You can face a reflective surface head on to compose a creative self-portrait, or you can change your perspective so the reflection focuses on another part of the area around you. For advanced photographers: I’d also recommend playing around with the exposure of the reflections. For instance, if you use a wide aperture and meter an area in the reflection, you can creatively alter the appearance (depth of field) of the areas outside of the reflection.

As the photos we took were before the challenge was issued, the tips have little relevance on the outcome in our case. However, I think Jared (I hope he doesn’t mind if I call him Jared) wrote such excellent tips, that they were worth quoting. We will think of them in the future, especially as we get more tangled in this photography web.

Petrusse River and bridges

The viaduct in the distance is echoed by the smaller bridge in the foreground

Petrusse River, and fortress walls

The same bridge is seen from the reverse angle, showing its relationship to the fortifications

Trees, walls, river, reflections

I just like this one, that’s all.

And so, a fortress, reflected.

PJD

Photos by CIA and PJD, Luxembourg, Easter 2012. Isn’t Luxembourg just totally awesome?

Others reflect:

Weekly Photo Challenge: Green

Colour challenges are easy, in the sense that finding photographs with a certain colour in them is usually straightforward. But, that being said, the harder task is finding a theme that can bind otherwise disparate images together. And so today I am looking at the alliterative joy of green and gothic.

Incidentally and tangentially, I always grew up with green associated with envy; a German colleague of mine in the Netherlands told me the colour is associated more with hope. What else does green make you think of?

PJD

Photos by PJD or CIA or others, in diverse European locations. Today’s post was brought to you by the letters G and P, the number 11 and the colour green.

Weekly Photo Challenge: Renewal

As the Northern Hemisphere descends towards Winter, through the Fall, this image speaks to the renewal of Spring. CIA took this photo of the bulbs which spring up everywhere in the Netherlands as the snow melts, and the sun starts to make itself felt.

Mostly Daffodils, Leiden, NL

PJD

Photo by CIA, near Da Kooi; we were completely surprised when this otherwise ordinary stretch of public space was suddenly transformed into this verdant field of flowers.

Weekly Photo Challenged?

Weekly Photo Challenge: Geometry

Geometry isn’t always an inspirational subject. I remember struggling with trigonometry, eventually reaching a point where I could reliably get the correct answer, with absolutely no understanding of the mechanics underpinning the calculations. Geometry in photography though, is a much more attractive proposition.

The geometrically complex concert hall in Reykjavík, Harpa, provides a good setting for studies of geometry. The building itself, constructed of steel-framed polygonic windows was (and is) controversial. A product of the Icelandic artist Ólafur Elíasson, as well as Henning Larsen Architects and Batteríið, construction began before the 2008 crash which triggered world-wide economic difficulties.

The expensive building was the subject of considerable debate in Iceland, before the Parliament eventually agreed to fully fund the construction of the building. I’ve been told there was some discussion that the foundations of the building should be left unfinished, to remind Icelanders of their economic folly, and as a tribute to hubris. We can, should, and must be grateful that things turned out differently, and that we have instead a beautiful, striking building which could be thought of as a Sydney Opera House (another exercise in geometry, budget overruns, and for which we can now all be grateful) of the North.

The interaction between the mirrored ceiling, the lights — which were designed to evoke the Aurora Borealis, and the optical-illusory nature of the various internal levels are astonishing. It is hard to imagine that the designers knew exactly what effect their design would have, but the building stands, gorgeously, as testament to geometry and architecture.

PJD

Photos by PJD, on a cold evening in early September, 2012.

Weekly Photo Challenged?

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